Acosta resigns

cctxfan

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I don't what the guy was thinking back in 2008, but he had 30 witnesses/accusers and instead gave Epstein immunity from federal prosecution in exchange for a 13-month state sentence in which he apparently only served one day a week in jail. That's in addition to violating federal law by not notifying victims of the proposed plea deal. Not only that Acosta has proposed slashing the budget of the department that investigates child exploitation not only here in the US but across the globe.

The guy is a slime ball.
 

The_Major

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I don't what the guy was thinking back in 2008, but he had 30 witnesses/accusers and instead gave Epstein immunity from federal prosecution in exchange for a 13-month state sentence in which he apparently only served one day a week in jail. That's in addition to violating federal law by not notifying victims of the proposed plea deal. Not only that Acosta has proposed slashing the budget of the department that investigates child exploitation not only here in the US but across the globe.

The guy is a slime ball.
Likely doing what he was told.
 

Jdhmills

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it's pretty obvious he was working as directed, but that doesn't absolve him and he has no business holding a cabinet position.

Now he can go sign a book deal and make some $$.
 

cctxfan

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Who knows? I've become so jaded I just expect corruption and cover up when powerful people are involved. What motivation would Acosta have had for cutting him a break?
Maybe Acosta is a perv and felt sorry for Epstein. Maybe he was bought off or blackmailed or whatever. But let's say he was just doing as he was told by higher ups in the DoJ. That still doesn't absolve him. He was appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate to uphold the law. Letting someone off like this just because his boss told him to is unethical at the least. If he truly disagreed with the higher ups, he should have informed the president and gone to Congress. He had options but chose not to use them.
 

The_Major

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Maybe Acosta is a perv and felt sorry for Epstein. Maybe he was bought off or blackmailed or whatever. But let's say he was just doing as he was told by higher ups in the DoJ. That still doesn't absolve him. He was appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate to uphold the law. Letting someone off like this just because his boss told him to is unethical at the least. If he truly disagreed with the higher ups, he should have informed the president and gone to Congress. He had options but chose not to use them.
he resigned. you want his head now?
 

windycityhorn

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He never should have been a cabinet secretary in the first place. Can we agree on that? What does a U.S. attorney know about the Department of Labor? Makes you wonder why he got the post in the first place...

Acosta is gonna have to walk through life as the guy who let the child rapist skate, and his political career is dead forever. Good. But it's not just him. Many people along the line have fought for Epstein to get off as easy as possible. Cy Vance, the incredibly corrupt Manhattan DA, claims he "misread the law" when he arranged for Epstein to have the most lenient categorization for sex offenders. Epstein never once made a check-in with police in NY, which was a requirement of his plea deal. The list goes on.

Acosta happens to be the face of the scandal -- and it's a very punchable face -- but I hope the reckoning does not end with him.
 

Shane3

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He never should have been a cabinet secretary in the first place. Can we agree on that? What does a U.S. attorney know about the Department of Labor? Makes you wonder why he got the post in the first place...

Acosta is gonna have to walk through life as the guy who let the child rapist skate, and his political career is dead forever. Good. But it's not just him. Many people along the line have fought for Epstein to get off as easy as possible. Cy Vance, the incredibly corrupt Manhattan DA, claims he "misread the law" when he arranged for Epstein to have the most lenient categorization for sex offenders. Epstein never once made a check-in with police in NY, which was a requirement of his plea deal. The list goes on.

Acosta happens to be the face of the scandal -- and it's a very punchable face -- but I hope the reckoning does not end with him.
The Swamp has members from both parties.
 

Shane3

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Maybe Acosta is a perv and felt sorry for Epstein. Maybe he was bought off or blackmailed or whatever. But let's say he was just doing as he was told by higher ups in the DoJ. That still doesn't absolve him. He was appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate to uphold the law. Letting someone off like this just because his boss told him to is unethical at the least. If he truly disagreed with the higher ups, he should have informed the president and gone to Congress. He had options but chose not to use them.
Speaking of blackmail, one article I read was speculating about how Epstein became a billionaire. There might be an investigation into that aspect as well.
 
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ole tnhorn

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If he did something criminal, yes. Remember that a judge said the DoJ violated federal law when victims were not informed of the plea deal. This is pretty big deal.
I agree with your sentiment but is it realistic for a prosecutor to be convicted of a crime for this omission? Has it ever happened? BTW I'd love to hear the reason the victims weren't notified.
 

cctxfan

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I agree with your sentiment but is it realistic for a prosecutor to be convicted of a crime for this omission? Has it ever happened? BTW I'd love to hear the reason the victims weren't notified.
For the first question, probably not.
 

acreativeusername

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He lost his job. Likely doing what he was told. I'm fine with the outcome as it pertains to him.
In my opinion, that shouldn’t be the end of it. Doing what you’re told, knowing it’s illegal, opening the door for more underage girls to be abused should be punished extremely harshly

He had a chance to stand up for morality and being a generally good person, and failed spectacularly. That doesn’t warrant just losing your cabinet position. It warrants jail time

Imagine telling the victims “he was just doing what he was told, he lost his job, that’s it for him.” It’s a slap in the face
 
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mcb0703!

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In my opinion, that shouldn’t be the end of it. Doing what you’re told, knowing it’s illegal, opening the door for more underage girls to be abused should be punished extremely harshly

He had a chance to stand up for morality and being a generally good person, and failed spectacularly. That doesn’t warrant just losing your cabinet position. It warrants jail time

Imagine telling the victims “he was just doing what he was told, he lost his job, that’s it for him.” It’s a slap in the face
What law did Acosta violate that warrants jail time?
 

The_Major

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In my opinion, that shouldn’t be the end of it. Doing what you’re told, knowing it’s illegal, opening the door for more underage girls to be abused should be punished extremely harshly

He had a chance to stand up for morality and being a generally good person, and failed spectacularly. That doesn’t warrant just losing your cabinet position. It warrants jail time

Imagine telling the victims “he was just doing what he was told, he lost his job, that’s it for him.” It’s a slap in the face
I'm fine with that approach. In fact I support. What I'm not fine is calling for blood when it's the other team and looking the other way when it is. So if/when we want to start punishing all abusers of power I'm on board. But this selective outrage is tiresome and not interesting to me.

Not suggesting your outrage is selective. But when I see elected officials calling for his head but ignoring Lois Lerner types I have a problem with that.
 
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acreativeusername

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What law did Acosta violate that warrants jail time?
Not informing clients of the deal that was cut with Epstein, and then leading them on for months. From what I’ve read, that’s a felony, and it very likely led to additional people being abused

And I know that those additional abuses can’t be pinned on him, but in my mind, they are at least partially attributable to his felony, which makes me think it should have an increased punishment

It’s wishful thinking I know
 
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