Best Albums of the 90s

fdub206

Member Who Talks
Oct 29, 2008
971
1,740
0
kent, washington
I think my first Pearl Jam show in 93 was my most memorable. Rage Against the Machine at the Gorge in 97 was amazing and the energy around that show was incredible. Basically anything at the Gorge is top notch.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Young Williams

idighorns

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Feb 24, 2012
8,838
12,702
0
ATX - '45
I'd return the question and ask, what were the best shows you saw in the 90s?
I'll stick to bands that would be at least semi-mainstream college radio level.

Dinosaur Jr./My Bloody Valentine/Screaming Trees, late '92, NYC. This tour started 1000 bands. So loud, transcendent. MBV was in the middle slot, and I wasn't aware of the 10 minutes of white noise moment (it's one of their live trademarks), it really messed with my mind. Dinosaur Jr. (one of my favorite bands) came really close to matching MBV. My ears were ringing for days.

Afghan Whigs, '94, Blind Alley (eventually became Austin Music Hall I think). This was the Gentlemen tour, Afghan Whigs were pretty much at their peak musically with this album and Congregation before that, plus a solid repertoire of Motown covers. Greg Dulli was in full frontman mode, full of angst, regret, lust, self-loathing, and almost certainly drunk and coked up. They literally had to stop the set in the middle so he could "use the bathroom", and when he got back the set really kicked into overdrive and just kept building and building. One of those times where the band and crowd just kept feeding off each others energy.

Maybe not one of the best but one of the most memorable was seeing The Muffs at some Catholic church rec center in LA sometime in '94? The power to the stage went out in the middle of the set, so the mic and amps just went silent. The crowd just kept singing along and finished the entire song while the band just watched in awe.

I had a lot of fun going to punk rock and garage rock shows throughout the '90s. Saw bands in various cities, at warehouses, house shows, drag bars, record stores, coffee shops, and clubs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: windycityhorn

MikeHdez12

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Sep 3, 2012
32,556
50,793
0
San Antonio, Texas
I saw Radiohead on the OK Computer tour at the Hammerstein Ballroom in 1997. That's number one will a bullet. I still have the ticket stub tucked into the back of the CD case.
That's ****ing awesome. Man, wish I could've seen that. Of course, I would've been about ten at the time and my musical taste hadn't even really begun to develop, but that sounds like an all time experience.

Speaking of the nineties, the Hammerstein Ballroom was pretty much regarded as the home base for that most quintessential 90s wrestling promotion, ECW.

 
  • Like
Reactions: windycityhorn

windycityhorn

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Jun 11, 2012
3,434
6,156
0
Afghan Whigs, '94, Blind Alley (eventually became Austin Music Hall I think). This was the Gentlemen tour, Afghan Whigs were pretty much at their peak musically with this album and Congregation before that, plus a solid repertoire of Motown covers. Greg Dulli was in full frontman mode, full of angst, regret, lust, self-loathing, and almost certainly drunk and coked up. They literally had to stop the set in the middle so he could "use the bathroom", and when he got back the set really kicked into overdrive and just kept building and building. One of those times where the band and crowd just kept feeding off each others energy.
I went to one Afghan Whigs show in Austin, it might have been this one. I remember him spreading rose petals on the stage.

I love Dinosaur Jr. I saw them and Neil Young at the Erwin Center. Maybe the loudest show I ever saw.
 
  • Like
Reactions: idighorns

junglerules

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Feb 23, 2012
15,981
13,915
0
Texas
I just found out Garbage is playing San Antonio this Sunday.
I don't have any of their albums, but I really like 3 or 4 of their songs. "I Think I'm Paranoid" is probably my favorite. I was definitely intrigued by anything Butch Vig was involved in back in the 90's....
 

junglerules

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Feb 23, 2012
15,981
13,915
0
Texas
I went to one Afghan Whigs show in Austin, it might have been this one. I remember him spreading rose petals on the stage.

I love Dinosaur Jr. I saw them and Neil Young at the Erwin Center. Maybe the loudest show I ever saw.
I think the loudest show I ever went to has to go to The Toadies at Liberty Lunch in Austin.... I think it was a tour after Rubberneck had run its course, and they were debuting a bunch of new songs. I dig loud, but it was painfully loud.
 

Snuggles

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Jul 19, 2015
2,899
5,418
0
44
I went to one Afghan Whigs show in Austin, it might have been this one. I remember him spreading rose petals on the stage.

I love Dinosaur Jr. I saw them and Neil Young at the Erwin Center. Maybe the loudest show I ever saw.
Funny. Neil Young with Booker T and the MG’s backing up and Blind Melon opening at Erwin may be the loudest show I’ve heard.

For craziest mosh pits I dared not enter, Ministry at Lollapalooza 2 in Houston takes the cake. They weren’t really my thing, any way. Pearl Jam was just getting big and played early, while Ice Cube stole the show. It was so damn hot, I was ready to leave the Chili Peppers and just go home.

Luckiest show was in ‘92, staying around even though House of Pain cancelled their part of a dual headline show with some band we’d never heard of. They were crazy and awesome and those Rage and Against the Machine guys went on to have a nice run themselves.
 

Young Williams

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Jan 24, 2012
3,044
5,070
0
Nirvana, although I'm not sure there was a circumstance in which I could've seen them but "missed" them.
The Ramones. They had to cancel a couple of times in Austin, and then the last time they played was opening for Pearl Jam at Southpark Meadows at a show that was already sold out from a prvious reschedule (and also I hate Pearl Jam).



I've seen PE 3 times, and the first time I saw them in '92 was probably the worst.
I saw Blind Melon. Unless you liked generic hard rock, they kinda sucked. Best part was how much they hated playing their hit song, and how they played it really fast and heavy.
I've only seen Rage once, it was October of '93, with Quicksand at Liberty Lunch. Amazing show from both bands.
I saw Ben Harper front and center at Liberty Lunch in '96. Epic awesome show.

Chemical Brothers are my Great White Whale at the moment. Had tickets to see them in LA a couple of weeks ago but ended up having to back out on the trip. Sigh.
 

Young Williams

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Jan 24, 2012
3,044
5,070
0
Good question. I missed Nirvana (I was on Team Pearl Jam, you guys remember, that supposed rivalry was a thing). Metallica. GnR. Jane's Addiction. The Pixies, who I didn't see till they reunited. Same with Pavement. U2, didn't see them till the 2000s. Tom Petty, never saw him.

I'd return the question and ask, what were the best shows you saw in the 90s?

I saw Radiohead on the OK Computer tour at the Hammerstein Ballroom in 1997. That's number one will a bullet. I still have the ticket stub tucked into the back of the CD case.

Pearl Jam at Moody Coliseum in 1993 was pretty great, too.

I was never that much of a Deadhead but I did see the Grateful Dead in 1995 at Soldier Field in what turned out to be Jerry's last show. Wish I liked them more.
I saw Living Colour at the Unicorn in '93. Accidentally wandered in from behind the venue, ran into them just chilling by their bus and got to hang out and talk to them before the show. They were my favorite band in the world at the time, and that was a ****ing great show. Moshed and moshed.

Not really a "90s" band, but it was a concert I saw in the 90s...Got to see my first-ever Paul Simon show in '94 at the Myerson Center in Dallas. Front row, the same night OJ was chopping up his Mrs. Missed G2 (I think) of the Rockets-Knicks series so that I could see my all-time favorite for the first time.

Saw a fantastic Sarah McLachlan show at the Majestic Theatre in downtown Dallas in '94. This wasn't the sad dogs on TV with Sarah, this was the Sarah whose band rocked balls on the Fumbling album tour. Same night/weekend that Shawshank Redemption and Pulp Fiction were released 25 years ago this September.

The Ben Harper/Liberty Lunch show I mentioned above was an awesome, awesome show. Perfect time to see him, after his fantastic first 2 albums.

I remember when Pearl Jam played that Moody show in '93. I wasn't able to make it, but I had a bunch of friends who went.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PFD and idighorns

Young Williams

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Jan 24, 2012
3,044
5,070
0
I think the loudest show I ever went to has to go to The Toadies at Liberty Lunch in Austin.... I think it was a tour after Rubberneck had run its course, and they were debuting a bunch of new songs. I dig loud, but it was painfully loud.
I swear the loudest show I was ever at was freaking Bob Dylan in Colorado Springs in '99. I had to walk outside the venue for awhile just to clear the ringing in my ears before Paul Simon came on. Just...that voice. CRANKED to bejeebus. And the jangly guitars cranked higher to drown out the voice. The tickets I had to pay for, but the tinnitus was included free of charge.
 
  • Like
Reactions: junglerules

Young Williams

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Jan 24, 2012
3,044
5,070
0
Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of the release of Nine Inch Nails’ single “Closer”.

I’ll never forget coming home from college in May of ‘94, and Houston now had a radio station—The Buzz—playing all Alternative format. Wasn’t there when I’d left for school, boom, was there when I got back.

‘94 was pivotal. The year Cobain expired himself.

Speaking of ‘90s concerts, I saw McLachlan, Freedy Johnston, the Go-Go’s and Simple Minds that December of ‘94 at The Buzz’s Christmas show. Which was a pretty damned random lineup.

Bumping Adam Sandler’s “They’re All Gonna Laugh At You” and The Cranberries’ “Zombie” all the way there and back.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: PFD and idighorns

MikeHdez12

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Sep 3, 2012
32,556
50,793
0
San Antonio, Texas
Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of the release of Nine Inch Nails’ single “Closer”.
Surely one of the more widely misinterpreted jams ever. But I guess you can't have a chorus with those lyrics set against a groove that's pure sex and not expect it to end up on the Mount Rushmore of tiddy bar hits.

As to the music video, one time in high school, I just about expired from laughter because we were joking about how the room in the video was actually the garage of one of the guys in the group. As we're watching it, we're all laughing harder and harder as each weird surreal image passes by. The bugs, the crucified monkey, the spinning pig head, all part of his garage for some reason. We were dying! Lol, so stupid.
 

idighorns

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Feb 24, 2012
8,838
12,702
0
ATX - '45
Decent, mainstream heavy list. Sunny Day Real Estate was definitely one of my fave albums of that year (and many many years), and that is a great Guided by Voices record. Vitalogy is the only marginally listenable PJ for me. The Downward Spiral really blew me away when it came out, a serious departure from Pretty Hate Machine (which I liked). I think Nirvana Unplugged is a very good record that is also overrated because of the circumstances. Both Liz Phair and Pavement are good album with some great songs, but neither hold a candle to the albums before.
Off the top of my head, the only 2 I own are Sunny Day Real Estate and Green Day. Wife owns the Hole album, surprised she doesn't have the Nirvana Unplugged.

By comparison, look at this list of the best 40 hip-hop albums that year: https://hiphopgoldenage.com/list/top-40-hip-hop-albums-1994/
 

junglerules

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Feb 23, 2012
15,981
13,915
0
Texas
Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of the release of Nine Inch Nails’ single “Closer”.

I’ll never forget coming home from college in May of ‘94, and Houston now had a radio station—The Buzz—playing all Alternative format. Wasn’t there when I’d left for school, boom, was there when I got back.

‘94 was pivotal. The year Cobain expired himself.

Speaking of ‘90s concerts, I saw McLachlan, Freedy Johnston, the Go-Go’s and Simple Minds that December of ‘94 at The Buzz’s Christmas show. Which was a pretty damned random lineup.

Bumping Adam Sandler’s “They’re All Gonna Laugh At You” and The Cranberries’ “Zombie” all the way there and back.
+Live+ is also celebrating the 25th anniversary of "Throwing Copper" this year. They are re-releasing the album with 3 b-side cuts that didn't make it, and there are also packages available that will include the full 1994 Woodstock set. Still one of my favorite albums to this day. Found myself stuck down in a Youtube rabbit hole watching old concerts of theirs yesterday....
 

dmatx

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Sep 26, 2012
1,055
1,423
0
South Austin, TX
I went to one Afghan Whigs show in Austin, it might have been this one. I remember him spreading rose petals on the stage.

I love Dinosaur Jr. I saw them and Neil Young at the Erwin Center. Maybe the loudest show I ever saw.
I was at that NY/Dino Jr show! I was a freshman, living in West Campus. Neil Young w Booker T & the MGs as his band. Damn good show. Only time I got to see Dinosaur Jr in that era. Weird to see in the Erwin Center but still good.
 

dmatx

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Sep 26, 2012
1,055
1,423
0
South Austin, TX
I think the loudest show I ever went to has to go to The Toadies at Liberty Lunch in Austin.... I think it was a tour after Rubberneck had run its course, and they were debuting a bunch of new songs. I dig loud, but it was painfully loud.
I may have been at that one. Sometime around 95-97ish?

Loudest show I ever saw was Drive Like Jehu at Emo's. Must have been spring/summer of 94? Too young and dumb for ear plugs at that point (paying for it now!)
 

junglerules

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Feb 23, 2012
15,981
13,915
0
Texas
I may have been at that one. Sometime around 95-97ish?

Loudest show I ever saw was Drive Like Jehu at Emo's. Must have been spring/summer of 94? Too young and dumb for ear plugs at that point (paying for it now!)
Maybe 97ish? I was at UT from 1996-2000, so it’s probably in the earlier part of that window. I don’t think Liberty Lunch lasted until 2000, but I don’t recall for sure.
 

edmonded

Member
Jun 5, 2019
6
0
0
By request from @PFD who had the good idea.

Here's my personal list:

1) Radiohead, OK Computer
2) Pavement, Crooked Rain Crooked Rain
3) U2, Achtung Baby
4) Nirvana, Nevermind
5) Dr. Dre, The Chronic
6) R.E.M., Automatic For the People
7) A Tribe Called Quest, The Low End Theory
8) Smashing Pumpkins, Siamese Dream
9) Public Enemy, Fear of a Black Planet
10) Built To Spill, Perfect From Now On

That's leaving out a lot. Any of those especially the top 4-6 I could just as easily put at number one. It's a conversation starter, I'd love to see everyone else's.
Great list!!!
 

windycityhorn

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Jun 11, 2012
3,434
6,156
0
This seems like a good place to talk about Hootie. A lot of folks loved Hootie and the Blowfish in the 90s. I was not one of those people. Apparently Darius Rucker has been keeping score all these years.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/arts/music/hootie-and-the-blowfish-cracked-rear-view.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share

Even in the years before Hootie, an earnest and deceptively easygoing roots-rock band, became a global pop phenomenon, there were indignities. The South by Southwest festival turned them down, year after year. Record labels sent stiff rejection letters.

Still, Hootie persevered, thriving in the face of indifference. “If you played Hootie you were uncool,” Darius Rucker, the band’s frontman, said. “You know, I understood. It got so big.”

Rucker, fluently profane and exasperated about the vast chasm between the group’s outsize success and its general critical dismissal, said that he’d recently watched CNN’s docu-series on the 1990s, executive-produced by Tom Hanks (among others), and was frustrated to see that Hootie hadn’t even rated a mention.

“How the [expletive] can you do a show about ’90s music and not mention ‘Cracked?’” he asked, tying up his complaint with a coarse bow: “[Expletive] Tom Hanks!”
 
  • Like
Reactions: PFD

bodieman

Member Who Talks
Oct 29, 2008
891
903
0
Third Eye Blind- Third Eye Blind
Dispatch- Bang Bang
Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds- Live at Luther College
Gomez- Bring it On
Toadies- Rubbernecker
 

blankotx

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Nov 18, 2013
1,493
3,609
0
Live had so much promise. What the hell happened to them? Throwing Copper is a very good album. The Presidents of the... is a really interesting album. With songs like Kitty, Lump and Peaches, how could you go wrong?
Loved that Presidents album
 

junglerules

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Feb 23, 2012
15,981
13,915
0
Texas
This seems like a good place to talk about Hootie. A lot of folks loved Hootie and the Blowfish in the 90s. I was not one of those people. Apparently Darius Rucker has been keeping score all these years.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/arts/music/hootie-and-the-blowfish-cracked-rear-view.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share

Even in the years before Hootie, an earnest and deceptively easygoing roots-rock band, became a global pop phenomenon, there were indignities. The South by Southwest festival turned them down, year after year. Record labels sent stiff rejection letters.

Still, Hootie persevered, thriving in the face of indifference. “If you played Hootie you were uncool,” Darius Rucker, the band’s frontman, said. “You know, I understood. It got so big.”

Rucker, fluently profane and exasperated about the vast chasm between the group’s outsize success and its general critical dismissal, said that he’d recently watched CNN’s docu-series on the 1990s, executive-produced by Tom Hanks (among others), and was frustrated to see that Hootie hadn’t even rated a mention.

“How the [expletive] can you do a show about ’90s music and not mention ‘Cracked?’” he asked, tying up his complaint with a coarse bow: “[Expletive] Tom Hanks!”
Ha! Thanks for sharing. I liked Hootie then. Still like 'em now. A big part of that is Darius Rucker's voice. I love it. I've said it before- the music didn't reinvent the wheel, but I like it, so that's good enough for me.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PFD

malaise

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Jan 24, 2012
27,895
76,815
0
Atchomamahouse
This seems like a good place to talk about Hootie. A lot of folks loved Hootie and the Blowfish in the 90s. I was not one of those people. Apparently Darius Rucker has been keeping score all these years.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/arts/music/hootie-and-the-blowfish-cracked-rear-view.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share

Even in the years before Hootie, an earnest and deceptively easygoing roots-rock band, became a global pop phenomenon, there were indignities. The South by Southwest festival turned them down, year after year. Record labels sent stiff rejection letters.

Still, Hootie persevered, thriving in the face of indifference. “If you played Hootie you were uncool,” Darius Rucker, the band’s frontman, said. “You know, I understood. It got so big.”

Rucker, fluently profane and exasperated about the vast chasm between the group’s outsize success and its general critical dismissal, said that he’d recently watched CNN’s docu-series on the 1990s, executive-produced by Tom Hanks (among others), and was frustrated to see that Hootie hadn’t even rated a mention.

“How the [expletive] can you do a show about ’90s music and not mention ‘Cracked?’” he asked, tying up his complaint with a coarse bow: “[Expletive] Tom Hanks!”
@PFD hums hootie songs to get to bed
 

PFD

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Oct 29, 2008
16,110
18,330
0
Dallas
This seems like a good place to talk about Hootie. A lot of folks loved Hootie and the Blowfish in the 90s. I was not one of those people. Apparently Darius Rucker has been keeping score all these years.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/06/arts/music/hootie-and-the-blowfish-cracked-rear-view.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share

Even in the years before Hootie, an earnest and deceptively easygoing roots-rock band, became a global pop phenomenon, there were indignities. The South by Southwest festival turned them down, year after year. Record labels sent stiff rejection letters.

Still, Hootie persevered, thriving in the face of indifference. “If you played Hootie you were uncool,” Darius Rucker, the band’s frontman, said. “You know, I understood. It got so big.”

Rucker, fluently profane and exasperated about the vast chasm between the group’s outsize success and its general critical dismissal, said that he’d recently watched CNN’s docu-series on the 1990s, executive-produced by Tom Hanks (among others), and was frustrated to see that Hootie hadn’t even rated a mention.

“How the [expletive] can you do a show about ’90s music and not mention ‘Cracked?’” he asked, tying up his complaint with a coarse bow: “[Expletive] Tom Hanks!”
Ha! Thanks for sharing. I liked Hootie then. Still like 'em now. A big part of that is Darius Rucker's voice. I love it. I've said it before- the music didn't reinvent the wheel, but I like it, so that's good enough for me.
Ain’t nothing wrong with Hootie.
 
  • Like
Reactions: junglerules

Iz of Texas

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Mar 26, 2012
14,298
9,971
0
Austin
So I just read through this thread and I'll be the debbie downer....all opinions are attributable solely to this poster.

Most 90s music sucked. Grunge sucks. Pearl Jam and Nirvana are the two most overrated bands ever. I realize those aren't popular or mainstream opinions. Just never got into them.

For reference, I'm 45. But my musical tastes ran older cause the only other kids on my street were between 5-8 years older so I ended up listening to what they liked. I would choose classic rock and 80s over 90s every day and twice on sundays.

Funny enough, like SA, I thought Shake Your Money Maker was an 80s album but I then recalled that I listened to it all the time my junior year of HS which was 90-91. Great album.

I think Razor's Edge by ACDC was 90 or 91. I still consider most of the Bon Scott albums and Back In Black to be far superior but it's still good. ACDC isn't a 90s band however.

Arc Angels was a great album. Achtung Baby was the first U2 album I really got into. Unfortunately I also remember 90s as the decade in which two of my favorite bands at the time delivered utter dissapointments. First, the so-called Black album by Metallica. The biggest disappointment ever. I was already miffed by AJFA but understood that the sound had to change when Clif Burton died. But the Black album is awful.

And then there's Use Your Illusion I and II. Not at all the disappointment that the black album was, lots of good songs. But the wait combined with the fact that GnR was trying to follow up what I consider a top three hard rock album of all time (with LZ II and Back in Black the others) meant we were all bound to be a little let down.

When I went to college in 92 I got even more into classic rock than before. Lots more southern rock too.

I'm sure I have more thoughts but that's it for now. FLAME AWAY BITCHES!!
 

MikeHdez12

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Sep 3, 2012
32,556
50,793
0
San Antonio, Texas
So I just read through this thread and I'll be the debbie downer....all opinions are attributable solely to this poster.

Most 90s music sucked. Grunge sucks. Pearl Jam and Nirvana are the two most overrated bands ever. I realize those aren't popular or mainstream opinions. Just never got into them.

For reference, I'm 45. But my musical tastes ran older cause the only other kids on my street were between 5-8 years older so I ended up listening to what they liked. I would choose classic rock and 80s over 90s every day and twice on sundays.

Funny enough, like SA, I thought Shake Your Money Maker was an 80s album but I then recalled that I listened to it all the time my junior year of HS which was 90-91. Great album.

I think Razor's Edge by ACDC was 90 or 91. I still consider most of the Bon Scott albums and Back In Black to be far superior but it's still good. ACDC isn't a 90s band however.

Arc Angels was a great album. Achtung Baby was the first U2 album I really got into. Unfortunately I also remember 90s as the decade in which two of my favorite bands at the time delivered utter dissapointments. First, the so-called Black album by Metallica. The biggest disappointment ever. I was already miffed by AJFA but understood that the sound had to change when Clif Burton died. But the Black album is awful.

And then there's Use Your Illusion I and II. Not at all the disappointment that the black album was, lots of good songs. But the wait combined with the fact that GnR was trying to follow up what I consider a top three hard rock album of all time (with LZ II and Back in Black the others) meant we were all bound to be a little let down.

When I went to college in 92 I got even more into classic rock than before. Lots more southern rock too.

I'm sure I have more thoughts but that's it for now. FLAME AWAY BITCHES!!
There's a lot to unpack here and it'd take me all day if I tried. All I know is you can't call a great band like Nirvana overrated and then heap praise on Guns n Roses. That's like if I just said hey, steak is overrated. Y'all need to try hamburger, it's much better. **** steak, hamburger meat is where it's at.
 
  • Like
Reactions: fdub206

SAhornfan

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Oct 29, 2008
30,130
17,730
0
San Antonio, TX
So I just read through this thread and I'll be the debbie downer....all opinions are attributable solely to this poster.

Most 90s music sucked. Grunge sucks. Pearl Jam and Nirvana are the two most overrated bands ever. I realize those aren't popular or mainstream opinions. Just never got into them.

For reference, I'm 45. But my musical tastes ran older cause the only other kids on my street were between 5-8 years older so I ended up listening to what they liked. I would choose classic rock and 80s over 90s every day and twice on sundays.

Funny enough, like SA, I thought Shake Your Money Maker was an 80s album but I then recalled that I listened to it all the time my junior year of HS which was 90-91. Great album.

I think Razor's Edge by ACDC was 90 or 91. I still consider most of the Bon Scott albums and Back In Black to be far superior but it's still good. ACDC isn't a 90s band however.

Arc Angels was a great album. Achtung Baby was the first U2 album I really got into. Unfortunately I also remember 90s as the decade in which two of my favorite bands at the time delivered utter dissapointments. First, the so-called Black album by Metallica. The biggest disappointment ever. I was already miffed by AJFA but understood that the sound had to change when Clif Burton died. But the Black album is awful.

And then there's Use Your Illusion I and II. Not at all the disappointment that the black album was, lots of good songs. But the wait combined with the fact that GnR was trying to follow up what I consider a top three hard rock album of all time (with LZ II and Back in Black the others) meant we were all bound to be a little let down.

When I went to college in 92 I got even more into classic rock than before. Lots more southern rock too.

I'm sure I have more thoughts but that's it for now. FLAME AWAY BITCHES!!
I'm about 15 years older than you and really like the music I grew up with but managed to keep an open mind when it came to 90's music. I'm not a rap/hip hop fan but there was quite a bit of rock that came out of the 90s, before Country assumed the Rock mantle.

I disagree about the black album. It is still the only Metallica album I think is worth a ****. I get the impression that you dislike it because it's more mainstream than the others. Not a negative; I can't stand Bruce Springsteen post Born in the USA and really prefer everything before it. Not a big fan of post-Bon Scott AC/DC either. And don't get me started on Michael McDonald and the Doobie Bros.
 
  • Like
Reactions: fdub206

PFD

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Oct 29, 2008
16,110
18,330
0
Dallas
So I just read through this thread and I'll be the debbie downer....all opinions are attributable solely to this poster.

Most 90s music sucked. Grunge sucks. Pearl Jam and Nirvana are the two most overrated bands ever. I realize those aren't popular or mainstream opinions. Just never got into them.

For reference, I'm 45. But my musical tastes ran older cause the only other kids on my street were between 5-8 years older so I ended up listening to what they liked. I would choose classic rock and 80s over 90s every day and twice on sundays.

Funny enough, like SA, I thought Shake Your Money Maker was an 80s album but I then recalled that I listened to it all the time my junior year of HS which was 90-91. Great album.

I think Razor's Edge by ACDC was 90 or 91. I still consider most of the Bon Scott albums and Back In Black to be far superior but it's still good. ACDC isn't a 90s band however.

Arc Angels was a great album. Achtung Baby was the first U2 album I really got into. Unfortunately I also remember 90s as the decade in which two of my favorite bands at the time delivered utter dissapointments. First, the so-called Black album by Metallica. The biggest disappointment ever. I was already miffed by AJFA but understood that the sound had to change when Clif Burton died. But the Black album is awful.

And then there's Use Your Illusion I and II. Not at all the disappointment that the black album was, lots of good songs. But the wait combined with the fact that GnR was trying to follow up what I consider a top three hard rock album of all time (with LZ II and Back in Black the others) meant we were all bound to be a little let down.

When I went to college in 92 I got even more into classic rock than before. Lots more southern rock too.

I'm sure I have more thoughts but that's it for now. FLAME AWAY BITCHES!!
I liked Pearl Jam, but didn’t like Nirvana. I didn’t care for Nirvana’s music to begin with, and then I soured even more on the contrived Cobain cult of personality.

Shake Your Money Maker is a top 10 all-time rock album for me. The Crowes pretty much singlehandedly held down the Southern Rock fort for a generation.

I understand that many hardcore Metallica fans don’t like the Black album. But, as a casual Metallica fan, some of my favorite tracks are on that album, including “Unforgiven,” “Sad But True,” and “Nothing Else Matters.”
 
  • Like
Reactions: SAhornfan

Iz of Texas

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Mar 26, 2012
14,298
9,971
0
Austin
All good comments...except for that b-side from Kill 'em All one.

Maybe "sucked" was the wrong word for the Black album. It was just largely disappointing to me. Surprisingly to some I suppose, I think Ride the Lightening and MoP are largely on even footing when it comes to my favorites...Fade to Black is Metallica's best song. I blame switching from a bassist that used his fingers to one that used a pick.

It's funny that SA brings up Springsteen - he's probably my favorite singer/songwriter ever and I know he's polarizing a bit. I was only vaguely aware of him prior to Born in the USA due to my age and he simply wasn't played much on mainstream radio in Texas (IMO). I've seen him 10 times (which is minuscule compared to some hardcore fans). His pre-Born in the USA catalog is incredible. That album is also great but suffers a bit from the "it was more mainstream" than the others...maybe kind of like my feelings on the Black album.

As far as Nirvana, I can appreciate that they almost singlehandedly drove a new genre of music that became wildly popular, both with the audience and critics. And even though I like GnR better, I can admit that they didn't drive their genre like Nirvana did theirs. GnR's genre, to me, started in the late 70s with Van Halen among others. GnR simply came into it and proved they were better than everyone else for a short, glorious time. And I consider Def Leppard (probably also the Crue) to have really carried the mantle of that genre through most of the 80s until GNR showed up - I wore out my copy of Pyromania in 82-84. Waiting around for Hysteria was painful.

Someone mentioned the Guardians of the Galaxy soundtracks - they're awesome...hard to think of a better one that incorporated existing music put into a compilation.

I also like Meatloaf a lot. As strange as that sounds.

Country is a whole 'nother discussion. I also didn't listen to a lot of rap.
 

malaise

Member Who Talks (A Lot!)
Jan 24, 2012
27,895
76,815
0
Atchomamahouse
So I just read through this thread and I'll be the debbie downer....all opinions are attributable solely to this poster.

Most 90s music sucked. Grunge sucks. Pearl Jam and Nirvana are the two most overrated bands ever. I realize those aren't popular or mainstream opinions. Just never got into them.

For reference, I'm 45. But my musical tastes ran older cause the only other kids on my street were between 5-8 years older so I ended up listening to what they liked. I would choose classic rock and 80s over 90s every day and twice on sundays.

Funny enough, like SA, I thought Shake Your Money Maker was an 80s album but I then recalled that I listened to it all the time my junior year of HS which was 90-91. Great album.

I think Razor's Edge by ACDC was 90 or 91. I still consider most of the Bon Scott albums and Back In Black to be far superior but it's still good. ACDC isn't a 90s band however.

Arc Angels was a great album. Achtung Baby was the first U2 album I really got into. Unfortunately I also remember 90s as the decade in which two of my favorite bands at the time delivered utter dissapointments. First, the so-called Black album by Metallica. The biggest disappointment ever. I was already miffed by AJFA but understood that the sound had to change when Clif Burton died. But the Black album is awful.

And then there's Use Your Illusion I and II. Not at all the disappointment that the black album was, lots of good songs. But the wait combined with the fact that GnR was trying to follow up what I consider a top three hard rock album of all time (with LZ II and Back in Black the others) meant we were all bound to be a little let down.

When I went to college in 92 I got even more into classic rock than before. Lots more southern rock too.

I'm sure I have more thoughts but that's it for now. FLAME AWAY BITCHES!!
 
  • Love
Reactions: Young Williams