Film review: Steve Sarkisian's offense (Alabama vs. Notre Dame)

keganr

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I am back for another episode of my film reviews because it is something you guys are going to want to see.

Over this week, I have broken down the all-22 offensive tapes of Alabama against Texas A&M, Georgia, Auburn and Florida. In that, I took mental notes as well as made videos for myself to document what I was watching. So, I went ahead and watched the Alabama-Notre Dame game for the first time and did a recording.

When I say good morning Patrons and all that, it's for our Patreon we have with the Inside OU podcast. (Editors note: a special treat to our community here!)

In this, you're going to hear me go over Steve Sarkisian's offensive tendencies. I go over what is likely to translate between Alabama to Texas in 2021 and why I have my worries about the Longhorns' offense in 2021. What you won't see is how Sarkisian deploys his Mills concepts or how he's able to get certain players in one-on-one matchups. That is definitely more of a thing that happened in the regular season that I'll go over in another video. Credit to Notre Dame, who outside of four big plays offensively, went toe-for-toe with this Alabama machine.

Hope you all enjoy.

Fire back if you disagree...
 
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keganr

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You lost me at chicken **** that Lincoln Riley makes gourmet meals out of with nfl players all over the oline, tight ends, rbs, first round wrs and top qbs in the draft.
I don't remember Oklahoma having top NFL talent in 2015 or to start 2016 when he ended up just running through the Big 12, and now the defenses are actually legit. Oklahoma didn't have full fledged NFL players until the end of the 2016 season.

I wasn't saying Riley doesn't have NFL talent. He clearly does. He didn't at the beginning.

Maybe I'm mistaken. Riley just out-schemed everyone after I've gone back and watched all the games. The 2016 team started to impose their will at the end.

Personally, after all this research, I just don't see that being the same conversation with Sark. Once he gets the talent he needs in there, Texas will be rolllllling offensively.
 
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sherf1

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Not sure I understand your concerns with Texas running duo.

My understanding is the whole point of the scheme is to get double teams at the point of attack to move the D line, as opposed to relying on O linemen achieving that one-on-one.

If anything that should be easier for the O line to execute, with the trade off being you may not get a lineman to the second level as quickly to get the LB.

Basically you're helping the O line and asking more of the RB to make a play vs an unblocked LB, which is exactly what we should be doing with Bijan, no?
 

keganr

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Not sure I understand your concerns with Texas running duo.

My understanding is the whole point of the scheme is to get double teams at the point of attack to move the D line, as opposed to relying on O linemen achieving that one-on-one.

If anything that should be easier for the O line to execute, with the trade off being you may not get a lineman to the second level as quickly to get the LB.

Basically you're helping the O line and asking more of the RB to make a play vs an unblocked LB, which is exactly what we should be doing with Bijan, no?
If anything that should be easier for the O line to execute, with the trade off being you may not get a lineman to the second level as quickly to get the LB.

The trade off isn't good when you're playing a scheme like Oklahoma's where the LBs are playing ultra-aggressive. To me, you still gotta have OL that can MOVE people. If you don't the lanes for the LBs are going to be wide open. If you can't move a 0-tech or 3-tech defensive lineman and get to the second level*, a defense is going to be living in your backfield like Notre Dame was able to at times in this game.

So with that said, I mentioned in the video that I expect to see Texas run a bunch of outside zone next year. Alabama ran more counter in this game than they typically did all year, and that can be good, too. Then when you get that mauling, road-grading OL in the system? Duos is going to eat people alive.
 
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Ian Boyd

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Not sure I understand your concerns with Texas running duo.

My understanding is the whole point of the scheme is to get double teams at the point of attack to move the D line, as opposed to relying on O linemen achieving that one-on-one.

If anything that should be easier for the O line to execute, with the trade off being you may not get a lineman to the second level as quickly to get the LB.

Basically you're helping the O line and asking more of the RB to make a play vs an unblocked LB, which is exactly what we should be doing with Bijan, no?
That is my impression as well.
 

sherf1

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If anything that should be easier for the O line to execute, with the trade off being you may not get a lineman to the second level as quickly to get the LB.

The trade off isn't good when you're playing a scheme like Oklahoma's where the LBs are playing ultra-aggressive. To me, you still gotta have OL that can MOVE people. If you don't the lanes for the LBs are going to be wide open. If you can't move a 0-tech or 3-tech defensive lineman and get to a backfield, a defense is going to be living in your backfield like Notre Dame was able to at times in this game.

So with that said, I mentioned in the video that I expect to see Texas run a bunch of outside zone next year. Alabama ran more counter in this game than they typically did all year, and that can be good, too. Then when you get that mauling, road-grading OL in the system? Duos is going to eat people alive.
I guess my point is that approach defers the stress to the RB.

It becomes RB vs LB instead of O line vs D Line.

Maybe OU wins that but I would assume there will be multiple plays where Bijan hits a crease for big yards, so it would be a boom/bust approach.
 

keganr

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I guess my point is that approach defers the stress to the RB.

It becomes RB vs LB instead of O line vs D Line.

Maybe OU wins that but I would assume there will be multiple plays where Bijan hits a crease for big yards, so it would be a boom/bust approach.
Or Texas avoids running inside much at all besides counter and powers and lets Bijan, Whittington and Co. to eat up DBs all season on the edge. To me, the RPO screen game, outside zone game, counter and Mills needs to be Sark's bread and butter with that personnel. The OL is athletic enough.

I wish we could see what the foundation of the offense is going to look like regardless of the personnel. Though back to comparing the two coordinators, the 2015 offense at Oklahoma looked different than the 2016, the 2016 than the 2017 and so on and so forth. If I'm wrong and Sark has THAT ability, I'm in on Texas in 2022, not waiting until 2023.

*updated
 

stilesbbq

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Good stuff.

I dont UT will have the big dudes next year to run a lot of DUO. I do think you (and a lot of other Sooner fans) are underrating the OL.

A guy like Jordan Whittington or Jake Smith is gonna take a step up just making first downs on crossers and bubble screens. However I have no clue how good Casey Thompson or Hudson Card will be. I pray good enough
 

coach_bass

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I am back for another episode of my film reviews because it is something you guys are going to want to see.

Over this week, I have broken down the all-22 offensive tapes of Alabama against Texas A&M, Georgia, Auburn and Florida. In that, I took mental notes as well as made videos for myself to document what I was watching. So, I went ahead and watched the Alabama-Notre Dame game for the first time and did a recording.

When I say good morning Patrons and all that, it's for our Patreon we have with the Inside OU podcast. (Editors note: a special treat to our community here!)

In this, you're going to hear me go over Steve Sarkisian's offensive tendencies. I go over what is likely to translate between Alabama to Texas in 2021 and why I have my worries about the Longhorns' offense in 2021. What you won't see is how Sarkisian deploys his Mills concepts or how he's able to get certain players in one-on-one matchups. That is definitely more of a thing that happened in the regular season that I'll go over in another video. Credit to Notre Dame, who outside of four big plays offensively, went toe-for-toe with this Alabama machine.

Hope you all enjoy.

Fire back if you disagree...
Awesome breakdown and I will subscribe to your channel to follow your updates.

A couple things, I wonder if Mac jones reads the backer so quickly that he misses potential opportunities outside? I haven’t watched a lot of Sark’s film but do you think that is a consistent habit? Or perhaps is it coached that way? I’m really curious what the timing element of that play is.

Also, what is your opinion on Flood? Outside of the fact of Alabama’s o line having straight up maulers, does anything stick out to you technique wise? The LG’s positioning was very interesting but like you said he had a very subpar game. I keep reminding myself to look and see if Flood has any coaching clinic stuff for any of his preferences.
 

sherf1

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Or Texas avoids running inside much at all besides counter and powers and lets Bijan, Whittington and Co. to eat up DBs all season on the edge. To me, the RPO screen game, outside zone game, counter and Mills needs to be Sark's bread and butter with that personnel. The OL is athletic enough.

I wish we could see what the foundation of the offense is going to look like regardless of the personnel. Though back to comparing the two coordinators, the 2015 offense at Oklahoma looked different than the 2016, the 2016 than the 2017 and so on and so forth. If I'm wrong and Sark has THAT ability, I'm in on Texas in 2022, not waiting until 2023.

*updated
Yeah sounds like your criticism is more of the concept itself (duo) vs the OU approach, which is likely correct.

With hyper aggressive defenses, you either have to just blow them out of they way with superior execution, or rely on a lot of misdirection to turn the tables. Best example there is probably KSU in 2019, although I would be surprised if Sark had that in his locker.
 

keganr

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Yeah sounds like your criticism is more of the concept itself (duo) vs the OU approach, which is likely correct.

With hyper aggressive defenses, you either have to just blow them out of they way with superior execution, or rely on a lot of misdirection to turn the tables. Best example there is probably KSU in 2019, although I would be surprised if Sark had that in his locker.
If Sark pulls out 2019 Kansas State's fake-power scheme, I will need a new pair of pants. That's a little much, but probably true.


I seriously don't think Klieman has run much of this since this game, but he took COMPLETE advantage of Oklahoma's aggressiveness. I was in love watching this.

My criticism of running a bunch of double-combo blocks when you don't have the personnel that are just maulers, you don't move the front as much as you need to, allowing wide open run fit lanes. As I said in the video, if Texas chooses to run that a lot, fine. They'll catch a team like Oklahoma stunting or twisting just right for a massive run to take off. But you'll likely get beat more often than not with it until you have the DUDES up front to do it.

I'd like to see Oklahoma do more of it with Marquis Hayes, personally. They ran some duo stuff in 2020, but most of it was just with Creed Humphrey and Hayes in ordinary zone blocking.
 

keganr

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Awesome breakdown and I will subscribe to your channel to follow your updates.

A couple things, I wonder if Mac jones reads the backer so quickly that he misses potential opportunities outside? I haven’t watched a lot of Sark’s film but do you think that is a consistent habit? Or perhaps is it coached that way? I’m really curious what the timing element of that play is.

Also, what is your opinion on Flood? Outside of the fact of Alabama’s o line having straight up maulers, does anything stick out to you technique wise? The LG’s positioning was very interesting but like you said he had a very subpar game. I keep reminding myself to look and see if Flood has any coaching clinic stuff for any of his preferences.
Yeah!

So you guys have the link to my YouTube channel and I believe my unlisted playlist(?). If you all want access to it and want to check it, lemme know. We can figure out a way to make that work because most of it will be OU stuff I won't bring over.
 

sherf1

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If Sark pulls out 2019 Kansas State's fake-power scheme, I will need a new pair of pants. That's a little much, but probably true.


I seriously don't think Klieman has run much of this since this game, but he took COMPLETE advantage of Oklahoma's aggressiveness. I was in love watching this.

My criticism of running a bunch of double-combo blocks when you don't have the personnel that are just maulers, you don't move the front as much as you need to, allowing wide open run fit lanes. As I said in the video, if Texas chooses to run that a lot, fine. They'll catch a team like Oklahoma stunting or twisting just right for a massive run to take off. But you'll likely get beat more often than not with it until you have the DUDES up front to do it.

I'd like to see Oklahoma do more of it with Marquis Hayes, personally. They ran some duo stuff in 2020, but most of it was just with Creed Humphrey and Hayes in ordinary zone blocking.
That probably gets into the nitty gritty of O line play. My assumption would be that two average interior O line guys would be able to move a defensive lineman about the same as two very good ones given the massive schematic advantage of two on one, but it's entirely possible that's incorrect.
 
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keganr

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Awesome breakdown and I will subscribe to your channel to follow your updates.

A couple things, I wonder if Mac jones reads the backer so quickly that he misses potential opportunities outside? I haven’t watched a lot of Sark’s film but do you think that is a consistent habit? Or perhaps is it coached that way? I’m really curious what the timing element of that play is.

Also, what is your opinion on Flood? Outside of the fact of Alabama’s o line having straight up maulers, does anything stick out to you technique wise? The LG’s positioning was very interesting but like you said he had a very subpar game. I keep reminding myself to look and see if Flood has any coaching clinic stuff for any of his preferences.
Let's unpack this before I leave here for the night:

1) I definitely think Mac Jones is cut from the 'dump it underneath if you can' mentality that will translate to the NFL. Jones isn't usually a risk-taker, either. I think more of his issues is the game being too fast at times and him trusting the talent he had around him. It's still troubling to me in this instance that a second-year player as smart as Jones is even struggled at times having the patience, reading coverage and having the confidence to make a throw from one hash to the opposite sideline. Again, I ask if he even struggles at times, how much confidence can you have that the guys on campus are the answer? (see my take on Conner Weigman, 2022 QB that is a DUDE).

2) My opinion on Kyle Flood is that it's clear he has an identity he wants: Monsters that he can mold. It's the same thing Bill Bedenbaugh does. The two staffs are basically carbon copies of each other. So expect some bigger, heavier set recruits with enough tools and the right mentality that he wants to turn into something. I don't know a ton about offensive line fundamentals, but I do know about timing of blocks. When that Alabama OL finally wore down defenses, they just brutally beat the sh*t out of everyone. I mean, beat the absolute sh*t out of them up front.
 

keganr

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That probably gets into the nitty gritty of O line play. My assumption would be that two average interior O line guys would be able to move a defensive lineman about the same as two very good ones given the massive schematic advantage of two on one, but it's entirely possible that's incorrect.
It all depends on leverage, too. Like if a 0-tech turns into a shade or a 3-tech turns into a 4i or a 5 tech slides into playing a 4i. It can change things and allow double combo blocks to really open up the running lanes. But can you imagine with how late (I know Oklahoma is used as an example) Grinch will shift his front and then still stunt it, how the hell can your OL figure out who to block in that short of time?

It's an interesting concept. Alabama was much better up front with Dickerson in the game (center who got hurt in the SEC championship). But those guys are still DUDES.

This is the best example I have of what I'm talking about needing to be able to move people:

 
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sherf1

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It all depends on leverage, too. Like if a 0-tech turns into a shade or a 3-tech turns into a 4i or a 5 tech slides into playing a 4i. It can change things and allow double combo blocks to really open up the running lanes. But can you imagine with how late (I know Oklahoma is used as an example) Grinch will shift his front and then still stunt it, how the hell can your OL figure out who to block in that short of time?

It's an interesting concept. Alabama was much better up front with Dickerson in the game (center who got hurt in the SEC championship). But those guys are still DUDES.

This is the best example I have of what I'm talking about needing to be able to move people:

Loving the back and forth, appreciate you spreading the knowledge.

I have wondered why more people aren't using some of the little tricks like the shifts OU seems to deploy way more than anyone else.

I read the other day Kansas City uses more motion than any other team in the NFL on offense, and it's a point you highlighted for Bama too.

Things like that make me pull my hair out about trying to understand good coaching. Obviously there has to be thought behind it, but maybe it really just does come down to being as much of a pain in the ass as possible in terms of alignment and pre-snap confusion.
 

keganr

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Loving the back and forth, appreciate you spreading the knowledge.

I have wondered why more people aren't using some of the little tricks like the shifts OU seems to deploy way more than anyone else.

I read the other day Kansas City uses more motion than any other team in the NFL on offense, and it's a point you highlighted for Bama too.

Things like that make me pull my hair out about trying to understand good coaching. Obviously there has to be thought behind it, but maybe it really just does come down to being as much of a pain in the ass as possible in terms of alignment and pre-snap confusion.
As my HS coach tells me all the time, “Kegan, this is a really easy game that people make really hard”
 

foureyes

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Loving the back and forth, appreciate you spreading the knowledge.

I have wondered why more people aren't using some of the little tricks like the shifts OU seems to deploy way more than anyone else.

I read the other day Kansas City uses more motion than any other team in the NFL on offense, and it's a point you highlighted for Bama too.

Things like that make me pull my hair out about trying to understand good coaching. Obviously there has to be thought behind it, but maybe it really just does come down to being as much of a pain in the ass as possible in terms of alignment and pre-snap confusion.
No expert here but I know OC’s and QBs like motion because it clears the picture up for the QB. Makes it easier to read pre snap if it’s man or zone. Also forces the defense to have to realign correctly. In some instances the motion can cause the defense to look intently in the wrong area of the play and then an RPO bubble screen goes right back to the vacated area causing a numbers advantage for the offense. There were a couple of clips from his video like that in the beginning of the breakdown.
 

sherf1

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No expert here but I know OC’s and QBs like motion because it clears the picture up for the QB. Makes it easier to read pre snap if it’s man or zone. Also forces the defense to have to realign correctly. In some instances the motion can cause the defense to look intently in the wrong area of the play and then an RPO bubble screen goes right back to the vacated area causing a numbers advantage for the offense. There were a couple of clips from his video like that in the beginning of the breakdown.
Exactly. So why doesn't everyone use it every play?
 

Wings N Girls

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I felt like they went more vanilla offensively in this game because they knew they didn’t have to do anything crazy. Just watching the game in real time without rewatching film, it seems like they knew they could win with defense and Najee and keep it somewhat vanilla. At half you felt like it was over and Bama just wanted to get out of there and onto the title game. It was the lowest amount of points they’d scored all game.

im so excited for sark in Austin. With all of his motions and ability to create 1 on 1matchups I think our offense will be way better than w CTH despite Sark not having same level of talent
 
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Ian Boyd

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I guess my point is that approach defers the stress to the RB.

It becomes RB vs LB instead of O line vs D Line.

Maybe OU wins that but I would assume there will be multiple plays where Bijan hits a crease for big yards, so it would be a boom/bust approach.
Shouldn’t be a bust because you’re doubling at the line of scrimmage. To create a bust the OU guys would either need a mistake from Texas or for the LBs to shoot the gaps and catch Bijan in the backfield...which is pretty tough.
 
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keganr

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Shouldn’t be a bust because you’re doubling at the line of scrimmage. To create a bust the OU guys would either need a mistake from Texas or for the LBs to shoot the gaps and catch Bijan in the backfield...which is pretty tough.
I'd wager Brian Asamoah and David Ugwoegbu would welcome huge run fit lanes to get in the backfield.

So will Malcolm Rodriguez at Oklahoma State. Iowa State's defense and Baylor's defense are ultra aggressive in the run game.

You think Texas is going to be pretty athletic up front: why not just try to run a bunch of zone stuff? Allow your guys to win laterally instead of needing to win one-on-one or opening up lanes to get in the backfield. Kind of like Iowa State does with Breece Hall. Let Bijan Robinson pick his holes and go.

Alright I'm going to watch PK.
 

Ian Boyd

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I'd wager Brian Asamoah and David Ugwoegbu would welcome huge run fit lanes to get in the backfield.

So will Malcolm Rodriguez at Oklahoma State. Iowa State's defense and Baylor's defense are ultra aggressive in the run game.

You think Texas is going to be pretty athletic up front: why not just try to run a bunch of zone stuff? Allow your guys to win laterally instead of needing to win one-on-one. Kind of like Iowa State does with Breece Hall. Let Bijan Robinson pick his holes and go.

Alright I'm going to watch PK.
I think outside zone will be the main focus, but that's not really how duo works.

What matters is the edges, if the LBs crash downhill because they are unblocked the RB is reading them and can bounce outside, which in the case of Bijan Robinson is a budding disaster for the defense. Shooting gaps with your LBs against duo is a trap.

 

keganr

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I think outside zone will be the main focus, but that's not really how duo works.

What matters is the edges, if the LBs crash downhill because they are unblocked the RB is reading them and can bounce outside, which in the case of Bijan Robinson is a budding disaster for the defense. Shooting gaps with your LBs against duo is a trap.

It ends up working out for Notre Dame later. They adjust to this and show you why the LB shot the gap.
 

Snuggles

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Exactly. So why doesn't everyone use it every play?
From what I understand, the disadvantage is that it limits the ability of the QB or sideline to audible. It seems (idiot talking here) that the two most current options to decode the defense are:

1. Line up early, force the defense to lineup, and decide what you want to do with either a QB audible or look to the sideline for signals. Herman seemed to be more in this camp, with the “eye candy” being the risk of QB run.

2. Motion to force the defense to announce their coverages, etc, with options based on the defensive movement. Sark and Riley seem to be more in this camp.

I’m a little confused by the idea that moving the UT offense from #1 to #2 is worse against a Grinch defense. #1 allows the defense to wait for the offense to show their alignment, shift based on the defense, and then allow, last-second, the defense to change the look of the front without surprises from the offense. #2 seems to make shifts more difficult, with motion coming frequently as the ball is snapped. It would also seem to make the Grinch games more risky, with the possibility of a big gain because of QB options and misdirection around the hyper-aggressive front. I do agree that it will take superior processing and timing and likely won’t be crisp year 1. My hope is that a commitment to speed training of the off-season helps UT’s athletes win more 1-1’s instead of the “armor” and bullying DB’s approach.

I’m eager for someone to explain why the above is wrong.
 

Ian Boyd

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It ends up working out for Notre Dame later. They adjust to this and show you why the LB shot the gap.
Okay I'll get there.

Obviously on this example Notre Dame fails to set the edge so Najee has an outlet. If they set the edge well on the tight ends then shooting the gap might work. This is why teams like running duo from multiple TE sets or bunch sets, to help extend the front on the edge and give the RB somewhere to go.
 

bdub12

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I'd wager Brian Asamoah and David Ugwoegbu would welcome huge run fit lanes to get in the backfield.

So will Malcolm Rodriguez at Oklahoma State. Iowa State's defense and Baylor's defense are ultra aggressive in the run game.

You think Texas is going to be pretty athletic up front: why not just try to run a bunch of zone stuff? Allow your guys to win laterally instead of needing to win one-on-one or opening up lanes to get in the backfield. Kind of like Iowa State does with Breece Hall. Let Bijan Robinson pick his holes and go.

Alright I'm going to watch PK.
So it’s obvious you are an OU fan right?
 

sherf1

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From what I understand, the disadvantage is that it limits the ability of the QB or sideline to audible. It seems (idiot talking here) that the two most current options to decode the defense are:

1. Line up early, force the defense to lineup, and decide what you want to do with either a QB audible or look to the sideline for signals. Herman seemed to be more in this camp, with the “eye candy” being the risk of QB run.

2. Motion to force the defense to announce their coverages, etc, with options based on the defensive movement. Sark and Riley seem to be more in this camp.

I’m a little confused by the idea that moving the UT offense from #1 to #2 is worse against a Grinch defense. #1 allows the defense to wait for the offense to show their alignment, shift based on the defense, and then allow, last-second, the defense to change the look of the front without surprises from the offense. #2 seems to make shifts more difficult, with motion coming frequently as the ball is snapped. It would also seem to make the Grinch games more risky, with the possibility of a big gain because of QB options and misdirection around the hyper-aggressive front. I do agree that it will take superior processing and timing and likely won’t be crisp year 1. My hope is that a commitment to speed training of the off-season helps UT’s athletes win more 1-1’s instead of the “armor” and bullying DB’s approach.

I’m eager for someone to explain why the above is wrong.
Yeah same here, well put.

From my understanding, a lot of teams also have pretty consistent defensive checks vs motion or vs a sudden motion into something like a bunch allignment (basically, if they do that, we switch to Cover 3 or whatever), which combined with some tempo I think works to keep defenses in base and make the job much easier for the QB to process.

It also serves to disguise formations more for the offense when you motion into something you run a lot of, isn't as obvious as just lining up and running it.
 
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keganr

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So it’s obvious you are an OU fan right?
No, I just covered them and know their personnel really well. I do a podcast that talks about Oklahoma still and get paid to break down Oklahoma film.

Just go back into one of my older posts on this Flyover Football board and see what I have to say about Spencer Rattler if you think I'm a homer.
 

keganr

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Yeah same here, well put.

From my understanding, a lot of teams also have pretty consistent defensive checks vs motion or vs a sudden motion into something like a bunch allignment (basically, if they do that, we switch to Cover 3 or whatever), which combined with some tempo I think works to keep defenses in base and make the job much easier for the QB to process.

It also serves to disguise formations more for the offense when you motion into something you run a lot of, isn't as obvious as just lining up and running it.
Everyone is just retreating into match quarters or Cover Three these days smh.
 
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Inanehorn

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I don't remember Oklahoma having top NFL talent in 2015 or to start 2016 when he ended up just running through the Big 12, and now the defenses are actually legit. Oklahoma didn't have full fledged NFL players until the end of the 2016 season.

I wasn't saying Riley doesn't have NFL talent. He clearly does. He didn't at the beginning.
2015
QB - Baker Mayfield
RBs - Perine & Mixon who accounted for the bulk of the rushing yards
WRs- Westbrook& Shepard accounted for most receiving
TE - Andrews 7 tds
OL -- Tougher for me to tell.. finished with 2 1st team all conference guys... young cody ford and orlando brown were in the 2 deep, but unsure how much they played

I believe Lincoln Riley is an awesome OC, perhaps the brightest mind in all of football. You can also claim his schemes are less dependent on winning 1 on 1 matchups, and therefore require less talent across the board. But don't try to claim that he's working with chicken **** (Your words). The gap between the OU offensive talent and the rest of the Big 12 defensive talent is as big if not bigger than the talent gaps Bama enjoys in the SEC.
 

keganr

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Aug 14, 2020
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2015
QB - Baker Mayfield
RBs - Perine & Mixon who accounted for the bulk of the rushing yards
WRs- Westbrook& Shepard accounted for most receiving
TE - Andrews 7 tds
OL -- Tougher for me to tell.. finished with 2 1st team all conference guys... young cody ford and orlando brown were in the 2 deep, but unsure how much they played

I believe Lincoln Riley is an awesome OC, perhaps the brightest mind in all of football. You can also claim his schemes are less dependent on winning 1 on 1 matchups, and therefore require less talent across the board. But don't try to claim that he's working with chicken **** (Your words). The gap between the OU offensive talent and the rest of the Big 12 defensive talent is as big if not bigger than the talent gaps Bama enjoys in the SEC.
Baker wasn't great in 2015. Neither was Dede Westbrook. I'll give you the running backs (it's wild to think Oklahoma hasn't had anyone nearly as good as those two since). Sterling Shepard was special. The OL had Ty Darlington starting at center (all you need to know).

We can agree to disagree. I think Sark is walking into sort of the same situation at Texas sans the QB situation. I'm high on Bijan Robinson, Jordan Whittington, Jake Smith and Troy Omeire still. I might be missing more skill guys. Needs to rebuild that OL room.

See, we can have conversation without getting in an uproar.
 

Ian Boyd

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2015
QB - Baker Mayfield
RBs - Perine & Mixon who accounted for the bulk of the rushing yards
WRs- Westbrook& Shepard accounted for most receiving
TE - Andrews 7 tds
OL -- Tougher for me to tell.. finished with 2 1st team all conference guys... young cody ford and orlando brown were in the 2 deep, but unsure how much they played

I believe Lincoln Riley is an awesome OC, perhaps the brightest mind in all of football. You can also claim his schemes are less dependent on winning 1 on 1 matchups, and therefore require less talent across the board. But don't try to claim that he's working with chicken **** (Your words). The gap between the OU offensive talent and the rest of the Big 12 defensive talent is as big if not bigger than the talent gaps Bama enjoys in the SEC.
I'm with you on this one.

The 2015 Oklahoma Sooners had a senior Sterling Shepard going for over 1k receiving yards while Dede Westbrook got going over the course of the season, they had a few veteran OL that were good and then the up and comers like Orlando Brown, and they had Perine and Mixon.

That's already more talent at every level than the vast majority of the Big 12 in a given year.
 

Inanehorn

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Baker wasn't great in 2015. Neither was Dede Westbrook. I'll give you the running backs (it's wild to think Oklahoma hasn't had anyone nearly as good as those two since). Sterling Shepard was special. The OL had Ty Darlington starting at center (all you need to know).

We can agree to disagree. I think Sark is walking into sort of the same situation at Texas sans the QB situation. I'm high on Bijan Robinson, Jordan Whittington, Jake Smith and Troy Omeire still. I might be missing more skill guys. Needs to rebuild that OL room.

See, we can have conversation without getting in an uproar.
Baker's passer rating that year was 173.32. Just for reference Sam's best passer rating in a season was 151.82 and Pat Mahomes best passer rating at Tech was 156.92, so Baker wasn't as bad as you remember. Dede avg 16 yds per catch with 743 yards and 4 tds, so he was still pretty good.

Ian has also explained that Sark might have some issues at first with the offense, and I don't disagree. I think Texas has some pieces with Hookfin, Tyler Johnson, and incoming Hayden Conner that better match Flood's desired OL. Its going to take some time though. I also think OU is going to be a top 5 team next season, and have their best chance of winning a playoff game.
 

keganr

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Baker's passer rating that year was 173.32. Just for reference Sam's best passer rating in a season was 151.82 and Pat Mahomes best passer rating at Tech was 156.92, so Baker wasn't as bad as you remember. Dede avg 16 yds per catch with 743 yards and 4 tds, so he was still pretty good.

Ian has also explained that Sark might have some issues at first with the offense, and I don't disagree. I think Texas has some pieces with Hookfin, Tyler Johnson, and incoming Hayden Conner that better match Flood's desired OL. Its going to take some time though. I also think OU is going to be a top 5 team next season, and have their best chance of winning a playoff game.
As a Sam Ehlinger fan here, I don't think we should compare Mayfield's passer rating to Ehlinger's. Reference it to Oklahoma quarterbacks each year. Baker in 2015 is very similar to Rattler in 2020. Those are the two worst (lol) offenses Oklahoma has had under Riley.

Let's unpack this, too:

Why was Baker's passer rating that high anyways? It's an efficiency stat. More yards per attempt and completion percentage will inflate the number. Did Mayfield (and Rattler for that matter) hit some bombs? Noooooooooo doubt. But Riley's scheme can inflate some numbers.

Yards after catch, too. A bunch of Dede Westbrook's yards came on shallow, underneath stuff. Sterling the same with Shepard having more highlight moments.

Lincoln Riley brought in the shallow screen game that he continues to evolve into something new. He killed Mike Gundy with it in 2015 and then did it again in 2020 with H-backs and running backs. I still don't think people understand how bad Oklahoma played offensively against Oklahoma State in 2020.
 
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Inanehorn

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As a Sam Ehlinger fan here, I don't think we should compare Mayfield's passer rating to Ehlinger's. Reference it to Oklahoma quarterbacks each year. Baker in 2015 is very similar to Rattler in 2020. Those are the two worst (lol) offenses Oklahoma has had under Riley.

Let's unpack this, too:

Why was Baker's passer rating that high anyways? It's an efficiency stat. More yards per attempt and completion percentage will inflate the number. Did Mayfield (and Rattler for that matter) hit some bombs? Noooooooooo doubt. But Riley's scheme can inflate some numbers.

Yards after catch, too. A bunch of Dede Westbrook's yards came on shallow, underneath stuff. Sterling the same with Shepard having more highlight moments.

Lincoln Riley brought in the shallow screen game that he continues to evolve into something new. He killed Mike Gundy with it in 2015 and then did it again in 2020 with H-backs and running backs. I still don't think people understand how bad Oklahoma played offensively against Oklahoma State in 2020.
As is often the case, probably more we agree on than disagree on. My point of view is this when Baker dropped back to pass in 2015 he was throwing to 3 nfl receiving options(Dede, Shepard, & Andrews), Mixon is a great receiver out of the backfield (28 catches 4 tds), and Dimitri Flowers who was a great receiver for an H-back/FB(4 tds). The OU line wasn't as dominant as coming years, but it was still among the best lines in the conference. Riley did a great job maximizing that talent, which he always does.
 
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