Nebraska and the Big 12?

Ian Boyd

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Back when the Big 12 was assembled for the 1996 season, Nebraska was the presumed bully on the block. In fact, the terms for the annexation of the main Texas schools from the SWC to expand the Big 8 included provisions forced by the University of Texas designed to undercut Cornhusker dominance.

Partial qualifiers were the concern and they were nixed to Nebraska Head Coach Tom Osborne’s great consternation. The Huskers still competed in the Big 12 championship game in 1996 (losing to Texas), 97 (won a National Championship with quarterback Scott Frost), 99 (vengeance on Texas), and narrowly missed it in 2000 due to a one point loss to K-State, and narrowly missed it in 2001 but competed in the National Championship game (where Miami spanked them).

Osborne retired after the 1997 National Championship and things stalled out significantly under Frank Solich before crashing under Bill Callahan. Bo Pellini kept them respectable through their transition to the Big 10 before also being fired. Then the wheels really came off and Scott Frost has been fighting to get them reattached.

Football is VERY serious in Nebraska. The region is all-in on it as a pastime and cultural expression but they’ve really struggled to reconcile its place in their culture with their lack of advantages as a program. The Big 10 offered a chance to get away from overbearing Texas and to collect big time money from the B1G’s television contracts and various financial distributions. Then they betrayed Nebraska by pulling the plug on college football for 2020 and threatening to kick them out of the league if they try to play without the other schools.

Sometimes the devil you know is better than the one you don’t.

This is a colossal blow to the Nebraskan athletics programs, which include multiple, nationally competitive programs amongst non-revenue sports like baseball and women’s volleyball, as well as to the greater Lincoln economy which hinges on hosting students and packing in Memorial Stadium on Saturdays. They’re left to depend on the mercies of the B1G and its payouts to recover down the line.


All of this raises an interesting question though, who or what is Nebraska football? That’s a question the program itself has struggled to answer ever since Tom Osborne stepped down as head coach.

Who is Nebraska?

I’ve written a fair amount on this because it seems to me one of the most poorly understood stories in college football. Early Nebraska sets the stage for my story of the Big 12’s offensive evolution in my book, Flyover Football.


Their 90s teams were an absolute machine, rolling over opponents by absurd margins.

The 95 team first drew my attention as a counterfactual to modern notions of recruiting rankings. Some have retroactively claimed a dominant walk-on program (lol, huh?) or national recruiting built elite teams in Lincoln. In reality, they regularly awarded football scholarships to in-state players and filled their roster out with such players. Check out how their roster has evolved over time.

History of Nebraskans Husker lineup.jpg

Analysis of Nebraska's future is ALWAYS centered around recruiting. "Well they used to be able to recruit partial qualifiers, well they really need to recruit Texas, they gotta open up a pipeline to Florida/California, etc."

None of the commonly mentioned factors are really the key. What made Nebraska exceptional under Tom Osborne and Frank Solich was national recruiting strategies were not a make or break feature of the team. Their I-option offense could function at a high level with offensive linemen, tight ends, fullbacks, and even wide receivers and quarterbacks recruited from within the small state of Nebraska.

Their offense was built from stretch blocks, pulls, and run-centric offense. The Huskers could regularly field O-lines in which no one was terribly tall or long because the name of the game was reaching a defensive lineman's shoulder and then shoving/controlling people. Despite their limited population (two million), Nebraska grows plenty of young guys who love run blocking and are 6-2 to 6-4 with frames that can hold 290-310 pounds.

Scott Frost has technically evolved their offense to function on a similar level, but their last three recruiting classes (2018-20) included nine total Nebraskans whereas in their heyday the two-deep would include as many as nine Nebraskans on both sides of the ball. The notion of building out a roster with strategies the local football players can find success in at the collegiate level seems to have been lost in translation between 1997 and the current day Cornhuskers.

The intersection of Nebraskan and conference identity

The merging of Nebraska and the Big 10 West seemed to make an awful lot of sense. You want to talk about small midwestern states making the most of underrated recruits from farm country? That's the Big 10 West M.O. down to a T.

Granted the North division of the Big 8 and Big 12 has a similar identity, but those areas wanted to be more closely tied to Texas whereas with the Big 10 merger Nebraska tied themselves instead to the upper Midwest and Northeast. They also seem to have tied themselves to a conference that doesn't place the same importance on football as the Huskers and the Nebraskan economy

Much like Arkansas, the Nebraskan program needs to work out what exactly they want from their football program. Do they want to swim in a big sea with conference mates that don't necessarily share their values but will share a massive purse? Or do they want to maintain their tradition as an innovative giant-slayer in a conference full of scrappy overachievers?

Nebraska takes football very seriously and have a reputation as being something of a giant (formerly at least), but in reality they were always an underdog. Their excellence under Osborne was so prolonged everyone failed to realize what it was they were doing. Trying to nationally recruit top players from around the country and in talent hotbeds to choose offers to come to Lincoln over comparable offers to play at Ohio State, Alabama, Florida, Texas, Notre Dame, Clemson, LSU, etc....that dog won't hunt.

But cleverly building systems and strategies that can allow a roster built at least in part from scrappy locals with a few ringers thrown in to seize starring roles? Still feasible, and the sort of flyover football that has always defined the Big 12.

Think about it, Nebraska.
 

Gianthorns3585

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Good stuff Ian. I always hear that Nebraska has a special hate for Texas due to some past grievances. I don’t know my big 12 history. Do you know exactly what led to that feeling towards Texas?
 

Ian Boyd

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Good stuff Ian. I always hear that Nebraska has a special hate for Texas due to some past grievances. I don’t know my big 12 history. Do you know exactly what led to that feeling towards Texas?
Ending partial qualifiers and beating them several times at the tail end of their run of dominance. Texas upset them in the first ever B12 title game, ended two different long-running home game winning streaks, and then there was the 2009 deal.

They put :01 second (or two? I don't remember) back on the clock at the end of the 2009 B12 title game and Texas snatched victory from the jaws of defeat with a last minute field goal. Also notable: Nebraska kicked the ball out of bounds on the kickoff and then horse-collared Shipley, giving Texas basically all the yardage they needed in like a minute to kick that field goal and steal the win.

For the next offseason, Nebraska planned to move on to the Big 10 and had this massive run up to their home game with Texas that was all about ending on a high note by handing Texas an L on the way out. Seriously, their website was selling season tickets with that promotion and it was a big thing to finally pay back Texas before leaving the league. Texas was terrible that year and went into Nebraska major underdogs. But Mack got his team to take things seriously for a week, dropped some spread QB run game, and stunned them for a final L.

I think that mostly covers it.
 

Gianthorns3585

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Ending partial qualifiers and beating them several times at the tail end of their run of dominance. Texas upset them in the first ever B12 title game, ended two different long-running home game winning streaks, and then there was the 2009 deal.

They put :01 second (or two? I don't remember) back on the clock at the end of the 2009 B12 title game and Texas snatched victory from the jaws of defeat with a last minute field goal. Also notable: Nebraska kicked the ball out of bounds on the kickoff and then horse-collared Shipley, giving Texas basically all the yardage they needed in like a minute to kick that field goal and steal the win.

For the next offseason, Nebraska planned to move on to the Big 10 and had this massive run up to their home game with Texas that was all about ending on a high note by handing Texas an L on the way out. Seriously, their website was selling season tickets with that promotion and it was a big thing to finally pay back Texas before leaving the league. Texas was terrible that year and went into Nebraska major underdogs. But Mack got his team to take things seriously for a week, dropped some spread QB run game, and stunned them for a final L.

I think that mostly covers it.
Excuse my ignorance but what are partial qualifiers?
 

sherf1

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Honestly reading that made me think of Mike Leach and the Air Raid in Lubbock. Very different approach, but the whole thing of building a system around imperfect parts because you have a ton of them available seems to come from the same line of thinking.

Then you get successful and try to do what everyone else is doing, giving up your advantage and identity in the process.....
 

ripharley

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Players that only met some criteria for being admitted into school. Nowadays it's easier to get kids in, back then it was easier at Nebraska then elsewhere and they took full advantage.
Timely OP, especially considering the issue of coming re-alignments, well-written as usual.

My impression on partial qualifiers at the time was that Nebraska reaped the benefit of having a large pool of developing local talent, not on athletic scholarships but on something like aid from the counties in the state. Whatever the detail, the argument against was that they had a lot more folks attending practices than most.
 
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Ian Boyd

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Timely OP, especially considering the issue of coming re-alignments, well-written as usual.

My impression on partial qualifiers at the time was that Nebraska reaped the benefit of having a large pool of developing local talent, not on athletic scholarships but on something like aid from the counties in the state. Whatever the detail, the argument against was that they had a lot more folks attending practices than most.
There’s no argument for “Nebraska benefitted from local players” that makes a lick of sense by modern standards.

How is it an advantage to have much of your roster come from a state with 2 million (less at the time) people?
 
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ripharley

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There’s no argument for “Nebraska benefitted from local players” that makes a lick of sense by modern standards.

How is it an advantage to have much of your roster come from a state with 2 million (less at the time) people?
Intrinsically none of course. I guess the proof would come from analysis of how many junior/senior starters on their good teams were on full athletic scholarships for the duration.
 

DoctorO

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Wisconsin had a deal back in the 1970s where they allowed each state legislator to grant a waiver of out of state tuition surcharges to one out-of-state student each year. Many of these waivers were funneled (secretly, of course) into the athletic department and used to benefit athletes who weren't on athletic scholarships, including to members of the football team. Charlie McBride, who later became famous at Nebraska as the architect of the Blackshirt defense, was on the UW staff at the time as the O line coach. I have always wondered if he brought the "county scholarship" concept with him from the UW.
 
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Ian Boyd

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Wisconsin had a deal back in the 1970s where they allowed each state legislator to grant a waiver of out of state tuition surcharges to one out-of-state student each year. Many of these waivers were funneled (secretly, of course) into the athletic department and used to benefit athletes who weren't on athletic scholarships, including to members of the football team. Charlie McBride, who later became famous at Nebraska as the architect of the Blackshirt defense, was on the UW staff at the time as the O line coach. I have always wondered if he brought the "county scholarship" concept with him from the UW.
Doesn't matter. They had more Nebraskans on direct scholarship than you could ever get away with in today's era of recruiting rankings. If they filled out behind them with even more 2-star locals it's hard to see how that's a decisive advantage.

Unless you have a system that is designed to make the most of them all.
 

stevehorn

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Players that only met some criteria for being admitted into school. Nowadays it's easier to get kids in, back then it was easier at Nebraska then elsewhere and they took full advantage.
I disagree with part of your statement. The minimum NCAA academic requirements for recruits are tougher now than they were back then. However they still aren't tough. Actually it wasn't easier at Nebraska than elsewhere. Nebraska just signed more partial qualifiers, and ones better at football, than anyone else. Also they were as good as anyone keeping them eligible which was the key to partial qualifiers. Texas and a number of other schools tended to shy away from partial qualifiers because of the difficulty of keeping them eligible if you really expected them to be a student.

IIRC the actual agreement at the formation of the Big 12 was that you were limited to signing one partial qualifier per recruiting class. This still hurt Nebraska significantly when you consider that it has been reported that 8 of their 1995 starters were partial qualifiers. Later the NCAA eliminated the partial qualifier provision. I believe this was in the early 2000s.
 

matt103455

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I’d be down for Nebraska to come back. Colorado or Missouri would be cool too.

Arkansas would be a really good fit but we aren’t pulling anyone from the SEC.
 
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stevehorn

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Doesn't matter. They had more Nebraskans on direct scholarship than you could ever get away with in today's era of recruiting rankings. If they filled out behind them with even more 2-star locals it's hard to see how that's a decisive advantage.

Unless you have a system that is designed to make the most of them all.
This subject really can't be discussed without involving the steroid rumors. Nebraska did have a county scholarship system, but I have read a few credible stories in recent years that debunked the rumors that these were used primarily for kids "walking on" at Nebraska. However Nebraska did have a large and well run walk-on program. Being the only FBS school in the state and a consistent NC contender, I suspect they got a lot of very good walk-ons from within the state. The rumor was that they would take the big frame 210 pound walk-on (or 2*-3*) and put him on a steroid regimen that would have him playing at 270-280 as a redshirt junior.
 
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matt103455

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Forget about Colorado, I don't think they're really committed to football.
I don’t think so either. At least from what a few people that live in Colorado said. If we stay in the Big 12 and actually make it twelve teams I think it will be two AAC teams or something of that sort. Memphis would make sense.
 

Ian Boyd

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This subject really can't be discussed without involving the steroid rumors. Nebraska did have a county scholarship system, but I have read a few credible stories in recent years that debunked the rumors that these were used primarily for kids "walking on" at Nebraska. However Nebraska did have a large and well run walk-on program. Being the only FBS school in the state and a consistent NC contender, I suspect they got a lot of very good walk-ons from within the state. The rumor was that they would take the big frame 210 pound walk-on (or 2*-3*) and put him on a steroid regimen that would have him playing at 270-280 as a redshirt junior.
They were definitely way ahead on S&C in general. Even stuff like taking creatine.
 

DoctorO

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Doesn't matter. They had more Nebraskans on direct scholarship than you could ever get away with in today's era of recruiting rankings. If they filled out behind them with even more 2-star locals it's hard to see how that's a decisive advantage.

Unless you have a system that is designed to make the most of them all.
Don't really understand what your point is other than to be patronizing. My comment was simply related what I personally know to be the potential beginnings of the thought process behind instituting the Nebraska county scholarship program. I have no opinion as to whether it ended being an advantage, although I suspect that it may have been.
 

Ian Boyd

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Don't really understand what your point is other than to be patronizing. My comment was simply related what I personally know to be the potential beginnings of the thought process behind instituting the Nebraska county scholarship program. I have no opinion as to whether it ended being an advantage, although I suspect that it may have been.
My overall point is that Nebraska’s hey day came because they had a system that made the most of local players. I don’t think a roster largely comprised of Nebraskans has a good chance of being on of the most athletic, it’s too small a pool of athletes.
 
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coolhorn

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Nebraska's best hope of becoming even a semblance of what they were in the nineties lies in swallowing their pride and returning to the Big XII. The same is true for Arkansas. I think Nebraska is more ready to accept that fact than Arkansas though.

Realignment is coming, and sooner than five years from now. Surprisingly, the Big XII, which was all but given up for dead half a decade ago, is likely going to be the biggest agent in realignment when it happens.

I'm not privy to any inside information. I read the same articles everyone else does. What I have been able to glean so far is the likeliest move for the Big XII is some kind of a merger with a pared-down Pac-12. This could change tomorrow, but what I've heard most recently is what a lot of people know. West Virginia belongs in the ACC or SEC, and Nebraska belongs back in the Big XII. A merged Big XVI would be divided into Western and Eastern divisions, along these lines.
Eastern Division:
UT
OU
OSU
Tech
Nebraska
Iowa State
Kansas
Kansas State

Western Division:
USC
Oregon
Washington
Arizona
Arizona State
Stanford
UCLA
California

There are some obvious omissions. No TCU. No Baylor. No small religious-affiliated schools at all. No Colorado, which has shown little dedication to upgrading its' athletic programs. The same for Oregon State and Washington State. There won't be a Power Five...There will be a Power Four with each of the four conferences composed of sixteen teams. That means a place at the table for West Virginia in a conference where they fit much better geographically. The playoffs will be expanded to eight teams with the non-Power Four conferences guaranteed one place in the playoffs, so those schools moved down from the P-5 will still have access to the playoffs.

Again, this is just the most recent proposal that I've seen explored. Nothing is guaranteed except that it will probably change ten times before something concrete actually happens. However, these changes are interesting.
 

msflash

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Nebraska's best hope of becoming even a semblance of what they were in the nineties lies in swallowing their pride and returning to the Big XII. The same is true for Arkansas. I think Nebraska is more ready to accept that fact than Arkansas though.

Realignment is coming, and sooner than five years from now. Surprisingly, the Big XII, which was all but given up for dead half a decade ago, is likely going to be the biggest agent in realignment when it happens.

I'm not privy to any inside information. I read the same articles everyone else does. What I have been able to glean so far is the likeliest move for the Big XII is some kind of a merger with a pared-down Pac-12. This could change tomorrow, but what I've heard most recently is what a lot of people know. West Virginia belongs in the ACC or SEC, and Nebraska belongs back in the Big XII. A merged Big XVI would be divided into Western and Eastern divisions, along these lines.
Eastern Division:
UT
OU
OSU
Tech
Nebraska
Iowa State
Kansas
Kansas State

Western Division:
USC
Oregon
Washington
Arizona
Arizona State
Stanford
UCLA
California

There are some obvious omissions. No TCU. No Baylor. No small religious-affiliated schools at all. No Colorado, which has shown little dedication to upgrading its' athletic programs. The same for Oregon State and Washington State. There won't be a Power Five...There will be a Power Four with each of the four conferences composed of sixteen teams. That means a place at the table for West Virginia in a conference where they fit much better geographically. The playoffs will be expanded to eight teams with the non-Power Four conferences guaranteed one place in the playoffs, so those schools moved down from the P-5 will still have access to the playoffs.

Again, this is just the most recent proposal that I've seen explored. Nothing is guaranteed except that it will probably change ten times before something concrete actually happens. However, these changes are interesting.
I hate to see TCU and Baylor get screwed like that. Their dedication to football is much higher than Cal’s. It bothers me that “religious” schools get shut out by the state schools (not very American, IMHO).
.
 

ripharley

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My overall point is that Nebraska’s hey day came because they had a system that made the most of local players. I don’t think a roster largely comprised of Nebraskans has a good chance of being on of the most athletic, it’s too small a pool of athletes.
It will be more than a little ironic if the B1G backtracks, though doubtful — tOSU is really taking it to the decision makers. What’s happening in Ann Arbor?
 

tholly

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No TCU. No Baylor. No small religious-affiliated schools at all.
Im guessing the bigger religious affliliated schools are tolerated. This realignment game is gonna suck for some schools, states and fan bases. Certainly some lawsuits would be expected and warranted. Col, OreSt, WashSt, TCU, Bay, and others would be kicked out of the college football billionaires lottery club while Vandy, Purdue, Duke, Kansas, Mizzu, BC, ... are grandfathered in. Maybe theyll go to 18 team super conferences to accomodate the under served
 

coolhorn

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Im guessing the bigger religious affliliated schools are tolerated. This realignment game is gonna suck for some schools, states and fan bases. Certainly some lawsuits would be expected and warranted. Col, OreSt, WashSt, TCU, Bay, and others would be kicked out of the college football billionaires lottery club while Vandy, Purdue, Duke, Kansas, Mizzu, BC, ... are grandfathered in. Maybe theyll go to 18 team super conferences to accomodate the under served
What I see happening Tholly is WVU gets picked up by either the SEC or ACC. Mizzou gets their golden ticket into the B1G. Notre Dame joins the ACC full time. Colorado gets picked up by the B1G. Both the AAC and the Mountain West will beef up with TCU, Baylor, Oregon State, Washington State, etc. because the playoffs will expand to eight teams, with the group of five being guaranteed one of the eight slots. That would eliminate the need for lawsuits.
 
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panther52

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1. The Big 12 is playing, in part, because TCU, Baylor, Tech, et al. believe that being loyal satraps will convince Texas that owning a conference is a good thing. I think it will work. In the long run, it is in Texas' best interest to own a conference.

2. This was reinforced by spending today travelling across Nebraska in a Longhorn shirt and using a Longhorn face mask. These folks are disappointed by not getting to play, melancholy about having even less pull (by a lot!) in the Big Ten than they had in the Big 12, and wistful that they play Rutgers, Michigan State and Minnesota instead of playing (a) their neighbors (KU/K-State, I-State) and (b) the signature games against OU and, yes, even us, when the nation's eyes were on a Nebraska game.

Beware all these fancy, 'efficient' realignment ideas. No program has ever benefiting from leaving Texas' football conference. We need to understand that is true for Texas, as well.
 

coach_taylor

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Nebraska's best hope of becoming even a semblance of what they were in the nineties lies in swallowing their pride and returning to the Big XII. The same is true for Arkansas. I think Nebraska is more ready to accept that fact than Arkansas though.

Realignment is coming, and sooner than five years from now. Surprisingly, the Big XII, which was all but given up for dead half a decade ago, is likely going to be the biggest agent in realignment when it happens.

I'm not privy to any inside information. I read the same articles everyone else does. What I have been able to glean so far is the likeliest move for the Big XII is some kind of a merger with a pared-down Pac-12. This could change tomorrow, but what I've heard most recently is what a lot of people know. West Virginia belongs in the ACC or SEC, and Nebraska belongs back in the Big XII. A merged Big XVI would be divided into Western and Eastern divisions, along these lines.
Eastern Division:
UT
OU
OSU
Tech
Nebraska
Iowa State
Kansas
Kansas State

Western Division:
USC
Oregon
Washington
Arizona
Arizona State
Stanford
UCLA
California

There are some obvious omissions. No TCU. No Baylor. No small religious-affiliated schools at all. No Colorado, which has shown little dedication to upgrading its' athletic programs. The same for Oregon State and Washington State. There won't be a Power Five...There will be a Power Four with each of the four conferences composed of sixteen teams. That means a place at the table for West Virginia in a conference where they fit much better geographically. The playoffs will be expanded to eight teams with the non-Power Four conferences guaranteed one place in the playoffs, so those schools moved down from the P-5 will still have access to the playoffs.

Again, this is just the most recent proposal that I've seen explored. Nothing is guaranteed except that it will probably change ten times before something concrete actually happens. However, these changes are interesting.
After observing how the west coast schools treated COVID in regards to football I have a hard time seeing Texas and other schools in the big 12 wanting to align with them. Too many differences. I would prefer taking 2 between Nebraska, Memphis, Iowa, Arkansas or Missouri.
 

coolhorn

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After observing how the west coast schools treated COVID in regards to football I have a hard time seeing Texas and other schools in the big 12 wanting to align with them. Too many differences. I would prefer taking 2 between Nebraska, Memphis, Iowa, Arkansas or Missouri.
Actually Coach, if I had my preference, the Big XII would add Nebraska, the Arizonas, and Arkansas, and call it a day. There's still the question of whether or not West Virginia stays. If they move to, say, the ACC, I'm not real sure who would replace them. Also, I'm pretty sure the big four conferences will all have sixteen teams, and if that's the case, some kind of B-12/Pac merger almost certainly has to happen.
 

coach_taylor

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Actually Coach, if I had my preference, the Big XII would add Nebraska, the Arizonas, and Arkansas, and call it a day. There's still the question of whether or not West Virginia stays. If they move to, say, the ACC, I'm not real sure who would replace them. Also, I'm pretty sure the big four conferences will all have sixteen teams, and if that's the case, some kind of B-12/Pac merger almost certainly has to happen.
I wouldn't hate that, UA is basically another Kansas at this point, great hoops not much football success or interest. ASU is interesting, on the rise in football I would say. Idk enough about the school itself to know how they look at football. I guess if you think 16 is the right number then that'd be okay. I just think football is the cash cow and I want schools where the interest aligns with Texas on football.
 

coolhorn

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I wouldn't hate that, UA is basically another Kansas at this point, great hoops not much football success or interest. ASU is interesting, on the rise in football I would say. Idk enough about the school itself to know how they look at football. I guess if you think 16 is the right number then that'd be okay. I just think football is the cash cow and I want schools where the interest aligns with Texas on football.
Personally, I would prefer a twelve team conference that included new members Arizona, Arizona State, Nebraska, and Arkansas, with Baylor and TCU gone. West Virginia is the outlier, and I don't know how long that situation can last. There's also the question of going to sixteen members. Without naming names, several prominent members of the Pac have some interest in the B-12 and if sixteen members becomes necessary, they would likely be added. The situation is way up in the air right now...but realignment's gonna happen in the next couple of years.
 
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bdwehner

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Ending partial qualifiers and beating them several times at the tail end of their run of dominance. Texas upset them in the first ever B12 title game, ended two different long-running home game winning streaks, and then there was the 2009 deal.

They put :01 second (or two? I don't remember) back on the clock at the end of the 2009 B12 title game and Texas snatched victory from the jaws of defeat with a last minute field goal. Also notable: Nebraska kicked the ball out of bounds on the kickoff and then horse-collared Shipley, giving Texas basically all the yardage they needed in like a minute to kick that field goal and steal the win.

For the next offseason, Nebraska planned to move on to the Big 10 and had this massive run up to their home game with Texas that was all about ending on a high note by handing Texas an L on the way out. Seriously, their website was selling season tickets with that promotion and it was a big thing to finally pay back Texas before leaving the league. Texas was terrible that year and went into Nebraska major underdogs. But Mack got his team to take things seriously for a week, dropped some spread QB run game, and stunned them for a final L.

I think that mostly covers it.
 

ttaghorn

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Awesome. Thanks Ian. This is awesome.
Awesome. Thanks Ian. This is awesome.
In simple terms, they were able to sign kids that couldn't spell cat if you spotted them the C A _. Four years later they still couldn't spell it. Would be very interested in they have stats on those they signed as PQ and their graduation rate.
 
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ttaghorn

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After observing how the west coast schools treated COVID in regards to football I have a hard time seeing Texas and other schools in the big 12 wanting to align with them. Too many differences. I would prefer taking 2 between Nebraska, Memphis, Iowa, Arkansas or Missouri.
My $.02, adding Memphis and Arkansas would be good for our Conference, both areas produce some good fertile cruitin grounds, also TV exposure closer to Miss, MO, even LA. Nebraska does nothing for us, TV marginal area, look how many Nebby kids they have on the roster, few, very few. We might gain some traction with OL, but doubtful. Any kid that is good wants to play at Neb, much like LA kids, they are brought up to see the Big Red. Not even mentioning the tremendous rivalry we had with Arkie back in the SWC days. My beef is they left us, so why should we want them back, they used to steal many of our better players, why give them another key to the State.
 

Ian Boyd

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Jan 14, 2014
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My $.02, adding Memphis and Arkansas would be good for our Conference, both areas produce some good fertile cruitin grounds, also TV exposure closer to Miss, MO, even LA. Nebraska does nothing for us, TV marginal area, look how many Nebby kids they have on the roster, few, very few. We might gain some traction with OL, but doubtful. Any kid that is good wants to play at Neb, much like LA kids, they are brought up to see the Big Red. Not even mentioning the tremendous rivalry we had with Arkie back in the SWC days. My beef is they left us, so why should we want them back, they used to steal many of our better players, why give them another key to the State.
Nebraska probably increases the size of the next television contract. Texas doesn't really need to incorporate more recruiting territories. Yes bringing in Nebraska would hurt recruiting for some Big 12 schools that would have to fend them off from poaching, but for Texas it wouldn't be a significant factor.

For the Big 12 in general it would hurt a lot of teams competitively but it would boost the money. How do you think the gate revenues and ratings would change for K-State, Kansas, and Iowa State if they had Nebraska on the schedule every year? Even Oklahoma would get excited about that and they obviously aren't hurting.
 

ttaghorn

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Oct 29, 2008
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New Braunfels, TX
Nebraska probably increases the size of the next television contract. Texas doesn't really need to incorporate more recruiting territories. Yes bringing in Nebraska would hurt recruiting for some Big 12 schools that would have to fend them off from poaching, but for Texas it wouldn't be a significant factor.

For the Big 12 in general it would hurt a lot of teams competitively but it would boost the money. How do you think the gate revenues and ratings would change for K-State, Kansas, and Iowa State if they had Nebraska on the schedule every year? Even Oklahoma would get excited about that and they obviously aren't hurting.
You are assuming we will be in the XII for the next TV deal, but if so I agree it would sweeten the pot. OK would drool over playing them again, it was a great game for both schools, much like Texas and Arkansas, a real family against family affair.