OT: Any farmers on the board?

windycityhorn

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Jun 11, 2012
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Or do you know any personally?

I’m researching a documentary project about the state of American agriculture. I’d like to include at least one farmer from Texas but right now I’m just doing research and talking to as many folks as I can. It’s all off the record. I’m not interested in ranchers as much at this point unless they also have a dairy operation and/or they’re also cultivating their land.

If you know anyone hit me up by DM. Thanks!
 

stevehorn

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Oct 29, 2008
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I might be able to give you some background. I grew up on a dairy farm and my maternal grandfather also ran a dairy. My parents sold our farm to my younger brother back in the early 80s. He continued to run the dairy until the early 90s when he got tired of not making any money. Today he grows hay and runs cattle on the farm, primarily because he likes doing it and to keep the agricultural exemption for property taxes.

I don't think he knows any dairy farmers very well. When we were kids, Johnson County was one of the top counties in the state for dairy production. Today there are almost none left.
 

ole tnhorn

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Jan 31, 2012
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Or do you know any personally?

I’m researching a documentary project about the state of American agriculture. I’d like to include at least one farmer from Texas but right now I’m just doing research and talking to as many folks as I can. It’s all off the record. I’m not interested in ranchers as much at this point unless they also have a dairy operation and/or they’re also cultivating their land.

If you know anyone hit me up by DM. Thanks!
Wrong board.Try TexAgs.com.
 

etexhorn

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Oct 29, 2008
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All the farmers in East Texas have starved out or moved! I don’t know of a single row crop farmer. Dairies are almost all gone too. A casualty of government regulations. Poultry, timber and cattle are the cash producers now.
 
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futures2015

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May 2, 2015
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Or do you know any personally?

I’m researching a documentary project about the state of American agriculture. I’d like to include at least one farmer from Texas but right now I’m just doing research and talking to as many folks as I can. It’s all off the record. I’m not interested in ranchers as much at this point unless they also have a dairy operation and/or they’re also cultivating their land.

If you know anyone hit me up by DM. Thanks!
Not a direct answer, but what I've been reading suggests that indoor farming (especially close to population centers) is going to be a "thing."

FWIW: my largest investment and only long term holding (buy/never sell) is a REIT: LAND. It buys working farms with ample water sources which they triple net lease back to farmers. It pays a monthly dividend and I buy an additional 100 shares every month the day before x-div date.

I would love to hear about your research when complete.
 

PFD

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Oct 29, 2008
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Dallas
I might be able to give you some background. I grew up on a dairy farm and my maternal grandfather also ran a dairy. My parents sold our farm to my younger brother back in the early 80s. He continued to run the dairy until the early 90s when he got tired of not making any money. Today he grows hay and runs cattle on the farm, primarily because he likes doing it and to keep the agricultural exemption for property taxes.

I don't think he knows any dairy farmers very well. When we were kids, Johnson County was one of the top counties in the state for dairy production. Today there are almost none left.
There are still a bunch of dairy farms up along Highway 82, from Archer County east to Cooke County, in little German towns like Windthorst, Scotland, Lindsay, and Muenster.

I used to hunt deer and hogs up in Archer and Jack Counties with some of them ol’ boys. Good people.
 

stevehorn

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There are still a bunch of dairy farms up along Highway 82, from Archer County east to Cooke County, in little German towns like Windthorst, Scotland, Lindsay, and Muenster.

I used to hunt deer and hogs up in Archer and Jack Counties with some of them ol’ boys. Good people.
I remember a bunch around WIndthorst when I was a kid. IIRC my brother sold his cows to a dairy in that area when he decided to get out of the business.
 
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PFD

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I remember a bunch around WIndthorst when I was a kid. IIRC my brother sold his cows to a dairy in that area when he decided to get out of the business.
It’s not a coincidence that Windthorst has long been an athletic powerhouse at the A and 2A level.

Those German kids are big and tough.
 

windycityhorn

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Jun 11, 2012
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Not a direct answer, but what I've been reading suggests that indoor farming (especially close to population centers) is going to be a "thing."

FWIW: my largest investment and only long term holding (buy/never sell) is a REIT: LAND. It buys working farms with ample water sources which they triple net lease back to farmers. It pays a monthly dividend and I buy an additional 100 shares every month the day before x-div date.

I would love to hear about your research when complete.
Thanks for the tip. I've been interested in investing in REITs for a while. In times like these it's looking like a more safe place to park some money and maintain yield.

Somewhat related to your point, I invest in a water ETF (CGW) and it's the only one of my holdings that's not taking a bath today. (Pun intended.)

I hope you see the results of my research on TV one day. I've been wanting to tell a farming story for a long time. I grew up among cornfields in Indiana in the 80s, during the farming crisis and I remember the images of white crosses nailed to courthouse lawns to symbolize foreclosed farms. It was 150 per hour at one point.

I think we may be seeing the beginnings of another farming crisis. Farming debt is at its highest level since the 80s. I don't want to do a gloom and doom doc, though. I love farmers and they're often unfairly blamed for many things that are beyond their control. They also tend to be the most patriotic of all of us, and the most self-sacrificing. I've talked to one farmer last week who works other jobs to make a wage and get benefits and farms when he gets home in the afternoon, and breaks even on the farm, all because he wants to pass the farm on to his son and grandson.
 
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futures2015

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May 2, 2015
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Thanks for the tip. I've been interested in investing in REITs for a while. In times like these it's looking like a more safe place to park some money and maintain yield.

Somewhat related to your point, I invest in a water ETF (CGW) and it's the only one of my holdings that's not taking a bath today. (Pun intended.)

I hope you see the results of my research on TV one day. I've been wanting to tell a farming story for a long time. I grew up among cornfields in Indiana in the 80s, during the farming crisis and I remember the images of white crosses nailed to courthouse lawns to symbolize foreclosed farms. It was 150 per hour at one point.

I think we may be seeing the beginnings of another farming crisis. Farming debt is at its highest level since the 80s. I don't want to do a gloom and doom doc, though. I love farmers and they're often unfairly blamed for many things that are beyond their control. They also tend to be the most patriotic of all of us, and the most self-sacrificing. I've talked to one farmer last week who works other jobs to make a wage and get benefits and farms when he gets home in the afternoon, and breaks even on the farm, all because he wants to pass the farm on to his son and grandson.
Inheritance taxes make passing on a family farm increasingly difficult. Farming is a tough gig.

I used to coach soccer with a guy who had a horticultural degree from U of Georgia. His parents gave him 20 acres and he built a plant nursery from the ground up. I was amazed at his abilities not just to grow stuff, but to build the infrastructure that he needed to propagate & grow stuff ... all learned at college of all places.
 

Iz of Texas

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Mar 26, 2012
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Austin
Thanks for the tip. I've been interested in investing in REITs for a while. In times like these it's looking like a more safe place to park some money and maintain yield.

Somewhat related to your point, I invest in a water ETF (CGW) and it's the only one of my holdings that's not taking a bath today. (Pun intended.)

I hope you see the results of my research on TV one day. I've been wanting to tell a farming story for a long time. I grew up among cornfields in Indiana in the 80s, during the farming crisis and I remember the images of white crosses nailed to courthouse lawns to symbolize foreclosed farms. It was 150 per hour at one point.

I think we may be seeing the beginnings of another farming crisis. Farming debt is at its highest level since the 80s. I don't want to do a gloom and doom doc, though. I love farmers and they're often unfairly blamed for many things that are beyond their control. They also tend to be the most patriotic of all of us, and the most self-sacrificing. I've talked to one farmer last week who works other jobs to make a wage and get benefits and farms when he gets home in the afternoon, and breaks even on the farm, all because he wants to pass the farm on to his son and grandson.
Are you actually John Mellencamp?
 
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