So, you want to trade Bitcoin

padrehorn11

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Haha the only thing gold has Bitcoin beat on is time. On all other dimensions Bitcoin is orders of magnitude better
Gold coins can be pretty. I have some of these in the birth year of my mother and father to hand down. And unlike my O&G royalties (which also cash flow), or Amazon stock, both of which beat the hell out of Bitcoin as investments, I can hold these. Don't care what they're worth, didn't buy to sell them,
 

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calvin farquhar

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Gold coins can be pretty. I have some of these in the birth year of my mother and father to hand down. And unlike my O&G royalties (which also cash flow), or Amazon stock, both of which beat the hell out of Bitcoin as investments, I can hold these. Don't care what their worth, didn't buy to sell them,

Gotta love the Liberty
 

futures2015

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Gold coins can be pretty. I have some of these in the birth year of my mother and father to hand down. And unlike my O&G royalties (which also cash flow), or Amazon stock, both of which beat the hell out of Bitcoin as investments, I can hold these. Don't care what their worth, didn't buy to sell them,
I love coins of all kinds (especially sets: pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, etc). I've been collecting for almost 60 years.

If I had to choose, my preference is silver - particularly Morgan silver dollars.



While I love American Silver Eagles as a bullion coin, I've been buying Canadian Silver Maple Leafs. They contain 1 Troy oz of .9999 (yes, 4 9s) fine silver and they have a face value of $5.

Whether you're talking about gold or silver coins, when you hold them in your hand, they feel like ... money.

Like you, my heirs may one day sell them, but I won't.
 

padrehorn11

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You and I are on the exact same wavelength. I collect Morgans too. St. Gaudens Gold Double Eagles and Morgan Silver Dollars are mostly all I collect. Both are beautiful coins . I have a few Maple Leafs and they are very nice; maybe I'll start that as another collection.

I also collect the Gibraltar gold pieces--the "Dog" Series. They've gone up in value the most of any coins I own, especially the Corgis. It's a niche market, but they only minted 35,000 of each denomination (1/25 oz., 1/10 oz., 1/5 oz, 1/2 oz and 1 oz.) in the series they began with in '91. I had a actual Corgi dog and so I got into these and the value has skyrocketed. I'm missing the Corgi 1/5 oz, I found one on E Bay once and bid a small fortune an hour before the auction closed. I had to be somewhere and damned if someone didn't beat me right at the last minute. I'd pay an obscene amount for one to complete my set which would be extremely valuable. Especially given that that 1/5 oz is the only one I've seen for sale in five years of searching. I should have bid more than an obscene amount, and will whenever I find one again.

And I have a few of every issue of the modern American Silver Eagles because I think they're pretty, particularly the Reverse Proofs. And I can match birth years for my grandson and grandnieces.
 

Shane3

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This was almost inevitable.



Experts have branded the move a dangerous power grab that marks Facebook's "most invasive" form of surveillance yet.

So far, Facebook has enlisted 28 firms, including Spotify and Uber, who each had to invest a minimum of £8million to be a founding member of the Libra Association, an independent not-for-profit membership organisation.

It wants to attract 100 businesses in time for launch, which it is aiming for the first half of 2020.

Libra is supported by a reserve of the world's best assets and the world's most trusted central banks, who gave the cryptocurrency "general cautious support", according to David Marcus, who started exploring blockchain at Facebook a year ago.
 

DC Horn

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This was almost inevitable.



Experts have branded the move a dangerous power grab that marks Facebook's "most invasive" form of surveillance yet.

So far, Facebook has enlisted 28 firms, including Spotify and Uber, who each had to invest a minimum of £8million to be a founding member of the Libra Association, an independent not-for-profit membership organisation.

It wants to attract 100 businesses in time for launch, which it is aiming for the first half of 2020.

Libra is supported by a reserve of the world's best assets and the world's most trusted central banks, who gave the cryptocurrency "general cautious support", according to David Marcus, who started exploring blockchain at Facebook a year ago.
A fool and his/her money (and privacy) are soon parted.
 

padrehorn11

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Bitcoin has a huge carbon footprint
The industry's defenders (a cryprocurrency aset management firm) say it's green because it uses renewable energy, but be skeptical. Very skeptical.

I would like to see a brainscan of the cognitive dissonance in the mind of a techno-savvy BItcoin-loving AGW advocate (who's always ready to blame scientists "funded by the fossil fuel industry" if they question one iota of the gospel of AGW.) Of course, you'd have to do some searching to find one with a brain to scan.

Amusing to me also is the enormous potential for cryptocurrenicies to help evade the taxes the Democrats, certainly all those running for President want to raise. Of course, the government will find a way to intrude itself into this supposedly 'off-the-record- economy....so I wouldn't count of the tax evasion possibilties to last long before cryprocurrency came under strict governemnt control, and any type that wasn't would be hunted down and eradicated.